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When did America become so beta? Saudi unhappy about bill related to 9/11

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by Mathloom, Apr 16, 2016.

  1. Mathloom

    Mathloom Contributing Member

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    Exaggerating obviously. But this is a pretty interesting development. You have no idea how much money they are talking about, I can tell you for a fact these numbers are under reported.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/16/w...mic-fallout-if-congress-passes-9-11-bill.html
     
  2. sirbaihu

    sirbaihu Member
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  3. Space Ghost

    Space Ghost Contributing Member

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    Great idea! Lets cut ties to the two most stable countries in the region.
     
  4. AroundTheWorld

    Supporting Member

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    Screw Saudi-Arabia. Their rulers compete with Pakistan and North Korea for the title of worst government on earth.
     
  5. Exiled

    Exiled Member

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    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2015/09/saudi-arabia-september-11-150929233729163.html


    meanwhile ,

    https://www.rt.com/usa/335174-iran-damages-september-911-victims/



    this took place within the past a few days , over 36 Muslim nations have a one thing to say about IRAN

    http://www.thenational.ae/world/europe/islamic-summit-condemns-iran-over-terror-support


    [youtube]/UYu_17U7ysw[/youtube]
     
  6. Cohete Rojo

    Cohete Rojo Contributing Member

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    Yes, Obama, the guy who bows to the Saudi King Will likely do everything he can to prevent this.

    But but but...human rights...liberal.
     
  7. Junkyard_Dog

    Junkyard_Dog Member

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    To be fair you can see this about any president...but wasn't like he was holding hands and kissing him or anything :rolleyes:
     
  8. Cohete Rojo

    Cohete Rojo Contributing Member

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    how nice of him to worry about the trial lawyers.

    [rquoter]Ryan has concerns over 9/11 Saudi bill but predicts veto override

    The U.S. House of Representatives would override any presidential veto of a bill allowing survivors and families of victims of the Sept. 11 attacks to sue Saudi Arabia, Speaker Paul Ryan predicted on Wednesday while also citing concerns with the legislation.

    "I worry about legal matters. I worry about trial lawyers trying to get rich off of this. And I do worry about the precedence. At the same time, these victims do need to have their day in court," Ryan, a Republican, told reporters.

    ...[/rquoter]
     
  9. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Insider Newsletter™ 2X Diamond Member

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    Interesting position for the new Saudi government. Not their biggest fan, but they're more or less a too big to fail nation state. Riyadh could end up like a rust-belt era Detroit (generous analogy) if they don't wake up anytime soon.

    As for the victims, highly unlikely they'll get a direct settlement that admits guilt, which the families likely prefers over reasonable money.

    [rquoter]
    [Financial Times 4/20]Mutual suspicion frays historic US-Saudi ties

    ...

    As US President Barack Obama arrives on a valedictory visit to Saudi Arabia this week, that 70-year-old bargain looks frayed by fractious relations with a ruling House of Saud that is coming under unpredictable new management. The shale-based energy revolution meanwhile shows the potential to liberate the US from dependence on Saudi and Gulf oil. Mr Obama’s main foreign policy achievement, the nuclear deal struck last year between international powers and Iran, is abhorrent to Saudi Arabia, whose virulently sectarian Wahhabi interpretation of Sunni Islam abominates the Shia Islam of Iran and its Arab network of co-religionists from Baghdad to Beirut.

    Even when the Iran deal was only at an interim and fragile stage in 2013, the Saudis were so affronted they rejected a seat for which they had vigorously lobbied on the UN Security Council. But differences between Washington and Riyadh had been steadily accumulating — starting with the fact that it was mainly Saudi terrorists, on orders of the Saudi Osama bin Laden, who struck America on 9/11.

    The Saudis could never reconcile themselves to the US-led invasion of Iraq, not because it toppled Saddam Hussein but because it led to Shia majority rule in an Arab country. When Hosni Mubarak was toppled by Egypt’s popular revolt in 2011, Riyadh accused Mr Obama of betraying a US ally. Saudi perceptions of US complacency in the face of Iran’s advances in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Yemen are a grievance far outweighing western perceptions of Isis jihadism as the main threat in and from the Middle East. After the Iraqi city of Mosul fell to a lightning Isis offensive in 2014, even the late Prince Saud al-Faisal, the respected Saudi foreign minister, remonstrated with John Kerry, US secretary of state, that “Daesh [Isis] is our [Sunni] response to your support for the Da’wa” — the Tehran-aligned Shia Islamist ruling party of Iraq.

    Mr Obama’s never-enthusiastic sentiments about the US-Saudi alliance, meanwhile, have become clearer after The Atlantic magazine published his candid thoughts last month. Obviously he sees Wahhabism as an ideology that fuels Islamist extremism worldwide and as a barrier blocking the Arab rendezvous with modernity.

    Alongside the international rapprochement with Iran, Mr Obama has long argued for a regional thaw and self-regulating balance of power between the Saudi and Iranian rivals. “The competition between the Saudis and the Iranians — which has helped to feed proxy wars and chaos in Syria and Iraq and Yemen — requires us to say to our friends as well as to the Iranians that they need to find an effective way to share the neighbourhood and institute some sort of cold peace,” he told The Atlantic.

    But any such regional détente remains anathema to Saudi Arabia, in which real power is now wielded by Mohammed bin Salman, deputy crown prince and 30-year-old son of the ageing King Salman — the first time the reins have passed from the sons of Ibn Saud to the third generation.

    The fiasco at last weekend’s oil summit in Qatar, when on Mohammed bin Salman’s instructions the Saudis tore up a production freeze deal they had largely devised because an Iran emerging from sanctions refused to be part of it, demonstrated beyond doubt that the kingdom’s visceral animosity towards its Shia rival trumps economic self-interest.

    ...
    [/rquoter]

    [rquoter]
    [9/14] ‘We Misled You’: How the Saudis Are Coming Clean on Funding Terrorism

    On his latest trip, a former senior U.S. official finds a new attitude in Riyadh. But will it stick?

    On my most recent trip to Saudi Arabia, I was greeted with a startling confession. In the past, when we raised the issue of funding Islamic extremists with the Saudis, all we got were denials. This time, in the course of meetings with King Salman, Crown Prince Nayef, Deputy Crown Mohammad Bin Salman and several ministers, one top Saudi official admitted to me, “We misled you.” He explained that Saudi support for Islamic extremism started in the early 1960s as a counter to Nasserism—the socialist political ideology that came out of the thinking of Egypt’s Gamal Abdel Nasser—which threatened Saudi Arabia and led to war between the two countries along the Yemen border. This tactic allowed them to successfully contain Nasserism, and the Saudis concluded that Islamism could be a powerful tool with broader utility.

    Under their new and unprecedented policy of honesty, the Saudi leadership also explained to me that their support for extremism was a way of resisting the Soviet Union, often in cooperation with the United States, in places like Afghanistan in the 1980s. In this application too, they argued, it proved successful. Later it was deployed against Iranian-supported Shiite movements in the geopolitical competition between the two countries.

    But over time, the Saudis say, their support for extremism turned on them, metastasizing into a serious threat to the Kingdom and to the West. They had created a monster that had begun to devour them. “We did not own up to it after 9/11 because we feared you would abandon or treat us as the enemy,” the Saudi senior official conceded. “And we were in denial.”

    Why this new frankness?
    ...

    One byproduct of the Saudi focus on ISIL and Iran seems to be a more enlightened view by Riyadh toward Israel. Israel and Saudi Arabia share a similar threat perception regarding Iran and ISIL, and that old hostility need not preclude greater cooperation between the two states going forward. The Saudis stated with unusual directness that they do not regard Israel as an enemy and that the kingdom is making no military contingency plans directed against Israel. They did emphasize the need for progress on the Palestinian issue, but the tone on this subject was noticeably less emotional than in the past. The clear priority was on defeating ISIL and balancing Iran from a position of strength.
    ...

    Read more: http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/saudi-arabia-terrorism-funding-214241#ixzz4Kv2Mrnzo
    [/rquoter]
     
    #9 Invisible Fan, Sep 21, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2016
  10. Dairy Ashford

    Dairy Ashford Member

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    Do you want gas in your car or not Cletus. This is global economics and national security Team Trump, not Twilight.
     
  11. Cohete Rojo

    Cohete Rojo Contributing Member

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    Yes, and thank goodness we don't need the Saudis for that.
     
  12. LongTimeFan

    LongTimeFan Contributing Member

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    So you want US citizens to be able to sue foreign governments and foreign governments be able to sue US citizens in their own legal system?

    I don't think you're thinking this through...
     
  13. Dubious

    Dubious Contributing Member

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    Do you think US oil companies wouldn't ship to the highest bidder anywhere in the world if the Saudi's weren't providing for the world market?
     
  14. Cohete Rojo

    Cohete Rojo Contributing Member

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    Yawn.

    U.S. Terrorism Victims File Lawsuit Targeting Part of Iranian Nuclear Deal

    Who?
    Cares?
     
  15. Cohete Rojo

    Cohete Rojo Contributing Member

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  16. Cohete Rojo

    Cohete Rojo Contributing Member

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    They must be racists, too.


    [​IMG]
     
    #16 Cohete Rojo, Sep 23, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2016
  17. FranchiseBlade

    FranchiseBlade Contributing Member
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    Except that simply opposing Obama isn't what gets Republicans called racist.
     
  18. trustme

    trustme Member

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    This is pretty r****ded.

    So should all those Iraqis be able to sue our government and military for basically destroying their country and lives over false accusations of WMD?
     
    FranchiseBlade likes this.
  19. Cohete Rojo

    Cohete Rojo Contributing Member

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    Yes, they should, for justice, peace, punishment, closure, etc.
     
  20. sirbaihu

    sirbaihu Member
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    Obama seems to think the U.S. has committed crimes on par with 9/11.

    Or he just doesn't want to go digging into who's responsible for 9/11.
     

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