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What are your views on relationships, specifically marriage?

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by DudeWah, Apr 4, 2016.

  1. okierock

    okierock Contributing Member

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    Doing it right...rare.

    Expecting people to make a solid decision on who would be the right person to spend their life with is unrealistic at best. If you do get lucky and choose correctly it is definitely worth it.
     
  2. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Contributing Member

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    Stumbled upon this... Interactive chart inside the link.
    Divorce Rates for Different Groups
    [rquoter]
    We know when people usually get married. We know who never marries. Finally, it’s time to look at the other side: divorce and remarriage. The chart below shows cumulative rates for different groups of people in the United States, based on 2014 American Community Survey, 1-year estimates.

    For example, by age 60, among the employed in 2014 who married at some time in their lives, 32 percent of women and 26 percent of men either divorced or remarried.

    A common myth about marriage is that half of them end in divorce. It comes from naively dividing the divorce rate by the marriage rate.

    For example, based on 2014 American Community Survey, 1-year estimates, there were 8.7 divorces and 17.0 marriages per 1,000 women. Divide the former by the latter and you get 51 percent. For men, it was 8.1 and 18.1, respectively, which gives you 45 percent. The problem with this math is that the people who marry now aren’t the same people who divorce now. Claire Cain Miller for the Upshot discussed this a while back.

    You can see this in the above too. No group ever goes past the 45 percent mark.

    What surprised me was the differences between men and women. I expected the percentages to end up at similar values for most of the groups, but there’s some flip-flopping between men and women as you change between different demographics. There also seems to be a bigger difference between men and women among the employed and those with advanced degrees.

    I’m not sure why this is. I thought that widows might increase the percentage of women who remarry, but when I looked at only those with a divorced marriage status (excluding those with a married status but married more than once), the differences increased.

    So my only guess is less divorce opportunity for men. We know they tend to marry later than women and die earlier. Maybe the window is smaller? I’m totally guessing though. If anyone knows better, feel free to email or get me on Twitter.
    [/rquoter]

    Divorce rates peaked in the 70s and 80s.
     
  3. DudeWah

    DudeWah Member

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    Unless I'm missing something, that's a misleading statement.

    Divorce and remarriage rates peak in people's 60's and beyond.

    That's not all that surprising as a lot of older people tend to remarry b/c of their spouse passing away.
     
  4. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Contributing Member

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  5. DudeWah

    DudeWah Member

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    Well, what I got from that article echoes what a lot of us were thinking, that the median age for marriage has gone up.

    I obviously agree with you that the data presented in this article says that divorces peaked for marriages that started in the 70's and 80's. I would say that doesn't paint the whole picture though, as 70% of marriages that began in the 90's reached their 15 year anniversary. That's compared to 65% of marriages that began in the 70's and 80's.

    That's not really a huge step up and is still about the same.

    Additionally, one of the articles the one you linked draws its premise from indicates the following, almost thrown in as an afterthought:

    http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1989124,00.html


    Seemingly, the divorce rate is still as high as ever within the last 50 years and is not really receiving any substantial improvement.
     

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