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Water Privatization: Nestle

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by Rocket River, Apr 20, 2013.

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Should water,A Natural Resource, be a public good?

  1. YES!

    31 vote(s)
    72.1%
  2. NO!

    11 vote(s)
    25.6%
  3. It's just water! Who cares.

    1 vote(s)
    2.3%
  1. Rocket River

    Rocket River Member

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    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/nTqvBhFVdvE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Nestlé CEO Says Water Is Food That Should Be Privatized – Not A Human Right


    Read more at http://americanlivewire.com/nestle-...-that-should-be-privatized-not-a-human-right/



    http://www.alternet.org/story/136117/communities_speak_out:_nestle,_stop_stealing_our_water
    Communities Speak Out: Nestle, Stop Stealing Our Water


    Should water . . . .A Natural Resource
    be a public good?

    Rocket River
     
  2. Bandwagoner

    Bandwagoner Contributing Member

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    That video was awesome, thanks. Love that guy.
     
  3. Refman

    Refman Contributing Member

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    Water, though provided by the local government or water district, is not treated as a human right. If you don't pay your MUD taxes or water bill, they will shut off your water.

    I am not comfortable with putting water provision in the hands of for profit entities. There are too many things needed for and ancillary to the provision of water. This vital service should remain as is.
     
  4. Haymitch

    Haymitch Custom Title
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    Walter Block has written extensively about making water, oceans, etc private. Worth checking out.
     
  5. Nook

    Nook Member

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    Business already has enough control over our resources, they don't need water as well.
     
  6. plcmts17

    plcmts17 Member

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    Quantum approves.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. thadeus

    thadeus Contributing Member

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    Business wants control over everything we need, all the time, forever.

    That's why the free market is all about liberty! Save us from the tyranny of government!
     
  8. justtxyank

    justtxyank Contributing Member

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    The article is from 2008?
     
  9. Rocket River

    Rocket River Member

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    Not so much about the Article as the Concept of OWNING WATER

    Rocket River
     
  10. Mathloom

    Mathloom Contributing Member

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    http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/blue-gold-world-water-wars/

    This guy is simply beating a war drum. The way I see it, I wouldn't deny water to even the worst of criminals, or charge them more for it, so what on earth would lead me to believe that water should be left to a free market?
     
  11. StupidMoniker

    StupidMoniker I lost a bet
    Supporting Member

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    Because water is a finite resource, just like any other commodity, especially fresh water. There is not enough water for everyone to have an unlimited supply. If you accept that premise, then the question becomes how is the water to be distributed. Should everyone get the same amount? Should you have to show a need and apply for an appropriate ration? Should it just be first come, first serve? Should you control the water on your own land?

    Why is trading in water any different than trading in food?
     
  12. dmoneybangbang

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    Water is not really a finite resource, this planet is mostly water. It's making the water safe for consumption that is the issue. A lot of middle eastern countries use desalinization because of the lack of fresh water and richness of energy.

    ....It's too bad Texas and/or America is not energy rich otherwise water wouldn't be an issue in Texas and drier states..... But we have no energy in this state or country..... :rolleyes:
     
  13. thadeus

    thadeus Contributing Member

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    Whose "liberty" do you truly believe in?
     
  14. Shroopy2

    Shroopy2 Contributing Member

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    It seems that Nestle is the embodiment of the bad "CORPORATION" so often demonized.

    I'm kinda all over the place on this issue tying different things into it, but....

    I don't support the environmental nannying position that in the end putting it in the hands of all private interests will "save us from ourselves" and our "over-consumption" abuse. At the same time other private businesses are DUMPING INTO waters and ruining them.

    (Its not all interconnected like that, but its odd how today it can be "Yes, privately owned. And?"
    then tomorrow its "CORPORATIONS must DIE" )

    I thought I read once researchers were doing a study on the subject that oncoming & future wars between countries will be fought over resources like water. And the researchers found SO LITTLE EVIDENCE of "water conflicts" happening that they basically stopped doing the study altogether. Pollution and waste aside as big as those issues are, we seem to be doing rationings well enough as-is.

    All that said, I think its inevitable that all known resources will have a handling controlling entity of some sort.
     
  15. Mathloom

    Mathloom Contributing Member

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    Water is not a finite resource. It's just that cheaply extracted/bottled water is a finite resource. I live in the country with the biggest desalinization plant in the world.

    No one is saying people should have an unlimited supply of drinkable (potable?) water.

    Everyone should get an equal minimum amount which is necessary to live (basically minimum drinking water). Everything else should be charged at the same rate to everyone. Controlling water on your own land - I don't know enough about this to be on any side of this argument.

    Why shouldn't trading in food be the same as trading in water? Why does water have to become like food instead of vice versa?
     
  16. Rocket River

    Rocket River Member

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    Generally there is a higher level of work involved in food.
    Has to be picked, cleaned, processed of a sort.
    Water is just there naturally

    While difficult I can raise food on me land
    but
    IF there is no water here . . .I cannot manufacture it.

    If we had a plant sitting somewhere with a bunch of H
    and squishing it into a bunch of O and making water
    then fine. . . I can see that
    but
    Simple pulling it from public lands and areas
    and reselling it back to the public is just kind of . . not right to me

    Rocket River
     
  17. ipaman

    ipaman Contributing Member

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    you pay for the service not the actual water. services include processing, delivery, waste processing, etc...

    you could install your own well (assuming no deed restrictions) and get water for free. well except the cost/fees related to providing yourself clean water, aka service.
     
  18. juicystream

    juicystream Contributing Member

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    That water would be on (in) your private property.

    Difficult question. Certainly I think you should be able to privatize water in which you own the entire source, but when it comes to shared water resources, it becomes a lot more complex. Certainly there would be a problem with me installing a well in my backyard and pumping out bottled water and thus taking away from my neighbors who share the same water source.
     
  19. Johndoe804

    Johndoe804 Member

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    If you want water shortages, poor water quality, and the state to decide who gets the resource, then, yes, water should be socialized.
     
  20. MoonDogg

    MoonDogg Member

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    Actually, depending on where you live, water can be a finite resource. Take the Colorado river for example. Under the Colorado River Compact created in 1922, water was allocated to 8 different states(with Mexico getting the shaft as usual). Since then, there has been numerous re-negotiations and bickering, especially during drought times. It's fascinating history if you're into that.

    It was divided up like this:

    Upper Basin, 7.5 million acre·ft/year (293 m³/s) total
    Colorado 51.75%* 3.86 million acre·ft/year (150.7 m³/s)
    Utah 23.00%* 1.71 million acre·ft/year (67.0 m³/s)
    Wyoming 14.00%* 1.04 million acre·ft/year (40.8 m³/s)
    New Mexico 11.25%* 0.84 million acre·ft/year (32.8 m³/s)
    Arizona 0.70% 0.05 million acre·ft/year (2.0 m³/s)
    *Percentages with a star are a percentage of the total after Arizona's
    0.05 million are deducted. Arizona's percentage is of the total.
    Lower Basin, 7.5 million acre·ft/year (293 m³/s) total
    California 58.70% 4.40 million acre·ft/year (172 m³/s)
    Arizona 37.30% 2.80 million acre·ft/year (109 m³/s)
    Nevada 4.00% 0.30 million acre·ft/year (12 m³/s)

    Water will be the new oil at some point in the future. There will be wars fought over it and countries without it will be at the bottom of the pile.

    Water is serious **** these days. Where I live, any water that falls from the sky within city limits belongs to the city. You're not allowed to catch any of it even in a simple bucket.
     

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