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Veena Malik sentenced to 26 years in jail for blasphemy after appearing in mock TV wedding scene

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by AroundTheWorld, Nov 27, 2014.

  1. AroundTheWorld

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    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/p...pearing-in-mock-tv-wedding-scene-9884985.html

    Veena Malik has expressed her anger and disbelief after she was handed a 26-year jail term by a Pakistani anti-terrorism court for ‘malicious acts’ of blasphemy.

    Her crime? Appearing in a pretend wedding scene, staged on a daytime show broadcast by Geo TV and based on the marriage of the Prophet Mohamed’s daughter.

    The programme sparked a wave of controversy in the Islamic country when it aired in May, despite the fact similar scenes had been aired in the past to little or no such public outrage. Some even apparently suspected that Pakistan’s military were behind the mock wedding, and that it was put on in a bid to wage a blasphemy war against the broadcaster.

    Malik’s husband, Asad Bashir Khan, and Mir Shakil-ur-Rahman, the chief executive of the biggest media group in the Asian country, were further sentenced to 26 years behind bars for the apparent religious offence. The host of the show Shaista Wahidi was also punished.

    “26 years! Come on. 26 years is a lifetime... But I have faith in higher courts in Pakistan,” Malik said in a recent interview quoted by Gulf News.

    “When the final verdict comes, it will do justice to me. Nothing bad is going to happen.”

    The court order will be enforced in the Pakistan-controlled city of Gilgit, which is also part of the India-claimed Kashmir regions.

    “The malicious acts of the proclaimed offenders ignited the sentiments of all the Muslims of the country and hurt the feelings, which cannot be taken lightly and there is need to strictly curb such tendency,” the court order, issued by the judge, reads.

    However, Malik may not actually end up serving her sentence.

    The court order will be enforced in the city of Gilgit, of which control is shared between Pakistan and also sits in the India-claimed Kashmir region. As such, it is not considered a proper province by Pakistan, meaning that any verdicts delivered by its courts do not apply to the rest of the county.

    “I have always been a person who faced troubles by looking it in the eye,” Malik, currently in Dubai, said of her decision to return to Pakistan in the next two weeks and challenge the court order.

    “I have faced highs and lows in my life. But I am sure I haven't done anything wrong.”

    As well as a hefty jail term, the convicted parties were also ordered to pay a fine of 3million rupees (£8,000), surrender their passports and even sell up their properties.

    The court case marks the latest in a string of controversies for the Bollywood actress.

    She sparked outrage in 2011 after posing for a series of risqué pictures for Indian FHM.

    She was depicted on the front cover of the men’s magazine with her arms and legs positioned to cover her private parts.

    The letters ‘ISI’ – the acronym for Pakistani spy service the Inter-Services Intelligence agency – were scrawled on her arm.

    ------------------------

    In another thread, we just saw that someone got sentenced to death in Iran for "insulting the prophet" with some Facebook posts.

    The common thread with what is happening in Pakistan to Veena Malik (and many others)? Islam (we even have two different brands of Islam at work here - Shiites in Iran and Sunnis in Pakistan - however, there is a common theme)

    Will Northside Storm argue that the problem is solely a generic "overarching abuse of power states grant themselves when it comes to civil liberties" or will he recognize that these people actually got sentenced because of Islam (or whatever the respective version of it is in these two very populous countries)?

    P.S.: It's even more of a travesty to treat Veena Malik this way because she is actually quite attractive:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. AroundTheWorld

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    Blasphemy in Pakistan
    Bad-mouthing

    Pakistan’s blasphemy laws legitimise intolerance


    THE killing and incarceration of people on flimsy accusations of insulting Islam has long shamed Pakistan. Hundreds, often members of religious minorities, have been ensnared by blasphemy laws that leave victims with little chance of defending themselves against malicious claims. Cowed judges are unwilling to examine evidence for fear of profanities being repeated in their courtrooms. Outside the courts, mobs can be quickly incited to acts of murder by fire-breathing mullahs.

    Accusations of blasphemy soar: just one in 2011; over 100 in 2014. More than half of the 62 people murdered in the wake of blasphemy allegations since 1990 were killed in the past five years, according to figures collated by a Pakistani human-rights group that fears even to be identified. “Blasphemy” can now include spelling errors by children or throwing away a visiting-card bearing the name “Muhammad”.

    On November 25th a judge in Gilgit-Baltistan sentenced the owner of Geo, Pakistan’s biggest private television channel, to 26 years in jail for broadcasting a popular Sufi song about the prophet during a light-entertainment show. (The court does not have nationwide jurisdiction, so the mogul is unlikely to ever be thrown behind bars.) The law encourages depraved vigilante attacks. In the latest, a pregnant Christian woman was beaten to death by an enraged mob.

    Liberal Pakistanis blame the country’s blasphemy craze on Zia ul-Haq, an Islamist dictator who died in a plane crash in 1988. He hardened British-era blasphemy laws. Derogatory remarks about the prophet Muhammad became a capital offence. But it was his “secular” predecessor, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, who amended the constitution to declare members of the Ahmedi minority non-Muslims even though they consider themselves such. Pakistan’s founder, Muhammad Ali Jinnah, once served as the defence lawyer for a carpenter who had murdered the publisher of a book said to be blasphemous.

    No politician has been prepared to confront blasphemy since Salman Taseer, the governor of Punjab province, was killed by one of his own bodyguards in 2011. He had sparked outrage by calling for mercy for a Christian woman, Asia Bibi, who had fallen foul of what he called a “black law”. Blasphemy cases are often thrown out by higher courts, but it can take years, during which time the accused is at great risk. On November 24th Ms Bibi filed an appeal with the Supreme Court.

    The police are also prey to the radicalising forces that are eating away at Pakistan. In November a man arrested for alleged blasphemy was killed by an axe-wielding policeman. The legal profession is also tainted. Lawyers greeted Taseer’s assassin at court with a shower of rose petals. It takes considerable bravery to defend someone accused of blasphemy. In May a lawyer, Rashid Rehman, was shot dead in the city of Multan for representing a man who was accused of insulting the prophet.

    The country’s clerics are united in defending the existing laws. The most vociferous opponents of reform are not the Saudi-style extremists empowered during the Zia era, but Barelvis, a school of Islam that some once looked to as a moderate bulwark against extremism.

    Unsurprisingly, many conclude they can cry blasphemy with impunity. In poor villages and urban slums countless vendettas can be settled in a blasphemy allegation. Almost two years after mobs burned down 100 Christian homes in Lahore the only person behind bars is the man whose alleged blasphemy triggered the riots.


    http://www.economist.com/news/asia/...bad-mouthing?fsrc=scn/fb/te/pe/ed/badmouthing
     
  3. dmc89

    dmc89 Member

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    The blasphemy laws are among the many reasons I can't recognize Pakistan as my second home anymore. I go there for work, and keep my visits brief. Many of my old friends and relatives have moved across the Arabian sea to Dubai and Abu Dhabi. The men fly to Karachi in the morning for business, and take the 2.5h flight back in the afternoon to the safety, stability, and cleanliness of the UAE. Others have permanently moved to the UK, Canada, Australia, and South Africa.

    In the last few years, the bonds to Pak have become fainter. It's abominable how the blasphemy laws have been used against anyone regardless of their belief, let alone how they never should've been passed in the first place. The nation has become a cesspool of institutionalized radicalism (broken legal system, corruption, extremist cops and attorneys). You're either an extremist Sunni or Shia, or you conform and do the greatest acting performance of your life if you wish to live. God help if you're secular, homosexual, atheist, Ahmadi, etc.

    On Jinnah, he took that case as an appellate lawyer because he thought Ilm's defense lawyer was "an idiot". He also severely opposed the death penalty which combined with the defendant's young age made him sympathetic to Ilm. Were Ilm an older man who had received a life sentence without parole, he likely wouldn't have taken his case. The way Economist wrote that article, it appears as if Jinnah condoned blasphemy laws. He didn't. If anything, he underestimated the true danger of the violent reaction to the Hindu author's 'blasphemy' - which was in response to Muslim 'blasphemy' regarding a Hindu goddess. Note that the Hindu response here was to fight back with words, not violence.

    Finally, the Barerlvi paragraph illustrates classic misunderstanding of labels and categorizing things which have no equal. Barelvi is somewhat moderate and very much opposed to Salafi/Deobandi/Saudi Islam. They get along with Shia Muslims and fight AQ/Taliban. They denounce suicide bombings and the killing of *innocent people. They love poetry and music and festivals and colorful clothing and shrines.

    *That being said, Barelvi Islam has not and has never been truly moderate in the way secular Westerners would want it to be. That is, Barelvis love, no ecstatically adore Muhammad. They believe he was the greatest thing ever (other than God) whereas many Muslims rightly see Muhammad as a simple human being who had his flaws. Barelvis don't think he was human. You cannot say anything other than the nicest things about Muhd in front of a Barelvi. This proves that moderate should be used sparingly as a label.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. AroundTheWorld

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    I didn't read the article that way. Can you explain why you think that?
     
  5. dc rock

    dc rock Contributing Member

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    You don't have to tell me what to think of Pakistan's government. Look at the **** they've put Saul and Carrie through...
     
  6. Buck Turgidson

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    Can't decide if hot or a tranny.
     
  7. Mr. Clutch

    Mr. Clutch Contributing Member

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    Hot for sure. Just too much makeup.
     
  8. downbytheriver

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    Do they make that flight everyday?I struggle seeing how it's worth putting your trust in pilots that fly into Pakistan. i imagine that country has seen enormous brain drain where every competent person in an educated field has left.

    pilots, doctors, engineers, etc.
     
  9. dmc89

    dmc89 Member

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    I'm sure there are more than one interpretations of that article.

    The way the sentences are arranged following the topic sentence made me think that way. It starts with liberals blaming pro-extremist General for blasphemy laws. Economist counters that by showing Bhutto wasn't as open-minded regarded religious freedom as thought hence the quotations around secular. Then, it ends with Jinnah, the founder of the country, defending blasphemy. It makes it seem like the blasphemy laws have their roots from the very founding of Pakistan. I disagree with that notion if that is what the Economist was going for. The experiences of my family and my own support the idea that the current conditions in Pakistan stem from the developments of the 1980s.
     
  10. dmc89

    dmc89 Member

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    Some fly every day. Some fly every week. Many still in Karachi, however they live behind secured palatial estates on the other side of town.

    I don't think you grasp the conditions there. I assume you believe flying into Karachi is the same as flying into Mogadishu or Kabul or Kinshasa. Several airlines fly into KHI with well-trained pilots so no one I've ever met has voiced concerns about that. The only airline and airports that I was anxious about were on an Aeroflot flying into Irkutsk.

    There has been a severe brain drain, increasing especially after Musharraf left power. The country is nevertheless filled with doctors, engineers, programmers, etc. Some don't have the wherewithal to immigrate abroad so they stay.
     
  11. s land balla

    s land balla Contributing Member

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    My uncle is currently a very senior pilot for PIA (Pakistan International Airlines). He is highly educated and is the son of a former Supreme Court judge and Acting President of the country.
     
  12. AroundTheWorld

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    What does your uncle (or you) think about those blasphemy laws?
     
  13. s land balla

    s land balla Contributing Member

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    My opinion is that they're absurd.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. shastarocket

    shastarocket Contributing Member

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    As do the vast majority of the educated Pakistanis
     
  15. AroundTheWorld

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    I have to ask - if it's the vast majority...why are they not repealing it? I don't see anyone having the courage to stand up and fight for it to be repealed? Salman Taseer got killed for his courage... :(
     
  16. downbytheriver

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    These judges and presidents are the same people enforcing such blasphemy laws and pushing the people to beastiality-- I would not give it much weight. It seems the educated Pakistanis portray the country as a lost cause ad want nothing to do with it --that's why I questioned the professional standard. I'm sure the younger generation, under 40 atleast, want to give their families a better life.
     
  17. shastarocket

    shastarocket Contributing Member

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    Fear? I really do not know. It is difficult to stand up for what is right when the court of public opinion can literally sentence you to death.

    It has become the status quo to take the conservative route. For example, in the TV wedding case referenced above, a talking head from a rival TV channel specifically accused all the parties involved of blasphemy.

    I can't say that the rabble-rousing by the media directly resulted in this sham of a sentence, but it seems like it was definitely responsible for the death threats. As a result Veena Malik, her family and Shahista Wahidi (the educated TV host) fled to Dubai and Qatar, respectively.

    All I know is that if in my lifetime Pakistan can become the hypersensitive clusterf&*k it is, it can also revert to a more moderate social and political climate
     
  18. downbytheriver

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    Interesting. Glad I can come here and still learn things.
     

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