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trump doj goes easy on roger stone...

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by NewRoxFan, Feb 11, 2020.

  1. Blatz

    Blatz Contributing Member

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    and trump voters will cheer for corruption out one side of their mouth and chant drain the swamp with the other...then move on to beans
     
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  2. dobro1229

    dobro1229 Contributing Member

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    He is definitely acting now exactly how we would expect him to act the day after he lost the election. He has 100% given up on whatever he actually considered to be his job as president.
     
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  3. dobro1229

    dobro1229 Contributing Member

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    Also the House MUST send over an additional article of impeachment even if they don’t want to hold extensive hearings. The Republicans in the Senate must be forced to vote their approval of blatant corruption and history needs this on the record or the House will be viewed in history as just as corrupt by refusing to do their duty.
     
  4. rocketsjudoka

    rocketsjudoka Contributing Member

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    This has to be one of the least surprising things to happen..
     
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  5. rocketsjudoka

    rocketsjudoka Contributing Member

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    This is pretty much what is happening.

    Given how much Trump supporters were defending Flynn this will not hurt him at all with his base. I'm guessing his base will either ignore it or consider it the right thing. With the overall electorate this will get lost among the many outrageous things Trump does and say.
     
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  6. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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  7. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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  8. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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    The Roger Stone Commutation Is Even More Corrupt Than It Seems

    President Trump’s commutation of the prison sentence of his long-time confidante Roger Stone is wholly unsurprising. Indeed, given Trump’s repeated teasing of the matter over the life of the case against Stone, it would have been something of surprise had he not intervened so that his felonious friend was spared time behind bars.

    But the predictable nature of Trump’s action should not obscure its rank corruption. In fact, the predictability makes the commutation all the more corrupt, the capstone of an all-but-open attempt on the president’s part to obstruct justice in a self-protective fashion over a protracted period of time. That may sound like hyperbole, but it’s actually not. Trump publicly encouraged Stone not to cooperate with Robert Mueller’s investigation; he publicly dangled clemency as a reward for silence; and he has now delivered. The act is predictable precisely because the corrupt action is so naked.

    In a normal world, this pattern of conduct would constitute an almost prototypical impeachable offense. But this is not a normal world. Congress is unlikely to bestir itself to do anything about what Trump has done—just as it has previously done nothing about the obstruction allegations detailed in the Mueller Report. Indeed, in the midst of a presidential campaign, a second impeachment would surely be ill-advised. The only remedy for this behavior, at least while Trump remains in office, has to lie in accountability in the context of Trump’s campaign for reelection.

    That is why it is so important to understand the history that led to the Stone commutation, just how corrupt it is, and why the predictability of the president’s action actually inflame public outrage—not inure the public to what Trump has done here.

    Roger Stone isn’t just Trump’s confidante or friend. According to newly unsealed material in the Mueller Report, he’s also a person who had the power to reveal to investigators that Trump likely lied to Mueller—and to whom Trump publicly dangled rewards if Stone refused to provide Mueller with that information. Now, it seems, the president is making good on that promise.

    When the report first became public in April 2019, it described how Stone reached out to Wikileaks during the 2016 campaign and represented himself to the Trump campaign as having inside information on upcoming releases of information damaging to Hillary Clinton. But a significant portion of the material on Stone was redacted because of ongoing criminal proceedings against him. Recently, however, following the guilty verdict against Stone, a court unsealed that hidden material thanks to litigation by BuzzFeed News and the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC). The newly unredacted information—some but not all of which was revealed over the course of Stone’s trial, but some of which was not previously public—is highly revealing of Stone’s relationship with the president.

    During the 2016 campaign, Mueller writes, Stone “made several attempts to contact WikiLeaks founder Assange, boasted of his access to Assange, and was in regular contact with Campaign officials about the releases that Assange made and was believed to be planning.” He spoke repeatedly about his connections to Assange, witnesses told Mueller, and his ability to find out what new releases of information Wikileaks was planning. Crucially, the unredacted information includes testimony from multiple witnesses who described Stone’s conversations about upcoming Wikileaks releases with high-level campaign officials—including Trump’s campaign chairman, Paul Manafort—and even Trump himself.

    According to Manafort, Trump personally told the chairman that he should keep in touch with Stone about Wikileaks. Another campaign official, Rick Gates, recalled an incident during the campaign in which Trump spoke by phone with Stone and then told Gates that, as Mueller paraphrases, “more releases of damaging information would be coming.” Trump’s former lawyer Michael Cohen told Mueller about overhearing a phone call in which Stone told Trump that “he had just gotten off the phone with Julian Assange and in a couple of days WikiLeaks would release information.” Then, Mueller writes, once Wikileaks began dumping material damaging to Clinton in July 2016, Trump “said to Cohen something to the effect of, ‘I guess Roger was right.’”

    So Trump clearly knew about and encouraged Stone’s outreach to Wikileaks, the unredacted report shows. Yet in written answers the president provided to Mueller’s office in the course of the special counsel’s investigation, Trump insisted that he did not recall “the specifics of any call [he] had” with Stone during the campaign or any discussions with Stone of Wikileaks. And shortly after he submitted those answers, the unredacted report states, Trump began tweeting publicly in support of Stone—calling him “brave” and congratulating his “guts” for refusing to testify.

    Trump’s tweets were always suspicious, to say the least. And his answers to Mueller seemed less than entirely credible even when the redacted report was first released. But the newly revealed text makes clear Mueller’s suspicions that Trump lied in his written answers—and then pushed Stone not to testify in order to prevent Mueller from discovering that lie. As Mueller put it dryly: “[T]he President’s conduct could also be viewed as reflecting his awareness that Stone could provide evidence that would run counter to the President’s denials and would link the President to Stone’s efforts to reach out to WikiLeaks.” The special counsel also writes that Trump’s tweets to Stone—along with his tweets criticizing Cohen, who was by then cooperating with investigators—“support the inference that the President intended to communicate a message that witnesses could be rewarded for refusing to provide testimony adverse to the President and disparaged if they chose to cooperate.”

    Stone did, indeed, refuse to provide testimony adverse to Trump. And while his precise relationship to WikiLeaks and Assange was never fully explained, he stood trial for lies to Congress denying his efforts to contact Wikileaks, and for intimidating another witness who could have contradicted those lies. As the judge in Stone’s case put it: “He was prosecuted for covering up for the President."

    Now, with Trump’s commutation, Stone has received the precise reward Trump dangled at the time his possible testimony was at issue.

    “Roger Stone is a victim of the Russia Hoax that the Left and its allies in the media perpetuated for years in an attempt to undermine the Trump Presidency,” the White House said Friday evening. In the White House’s telling, Stone was targeted by out-of-control Mueller prosecutors for mere “process” crimes when their “collusion delusion” fell apart. He was subject to needless humiliation in his arrest, and he did not get a fair trial. “[P]articularly in light of the egregious facts and circumstances surrounding his unfair prosecution, arrest, and trial, the President has determined to commute his sentence. Roger Stone has already suffered greatly. He was treated very unfairly, as were many others in this case. Roger Stone is now a free man!”

    Indeed he is. But the story may not be over.

    “Time to put Roger Stone in the grand jury to find out what he knows about Trump but would not tell. Commutation can’t stop that,” tweeted Andrew Weissman, one of Mueller’s top prosecutors, following the president’s action.

    That’s most unlikely while the Justice Department remains in the hands of Attorney General Bill Barr. But it’s far from unthinkable should Trump leave office in January. What’s more, the commutation means that the story Mueller tells about potential obstruction vis a vis Stone did not end with the activity described by the Mueller Report. It is a continuing pattern of conduct up until the present day. That potentially makes it easier for a future Justice Department to revive at least one of the obstruction questions that Barr squelched when he closed the cases Mueller intentionally did not resolve. In addition to all of the facts reported by Mueller, including facts that have been redacted until recently, Trump has now consummated the deal he dangled before Stone.

    That’s something the Justice Department may want to examine anew—someday.

    https://www.lawfareblog.com/roger-stone-commutation-even-more-corrupt-it-seems
     
  9. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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  10. Buck Turgidson

    Buck Turgidson Mineshaft Enthusiast

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    But what does Jonathan Turley think?
     
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  11. deb4rockets

    deb4rockets Trump is Toxic
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    Trump will protect and pardon his fixers, do favors for his his mob style shady associates, and lie out his teeth to cover his ass. His day will come. It's only a matter of time. He can't run (walk slowly maybe), he can't hide (just find him on the golf course), and he can't pay his way out of the trouble he's in.

    Donald Trump is going to get indicted’ when New York gets his tax returns: David Cay Johnston
    https://www.rawstory.com/2020/07/do...york-gets-his-tax-returns-david-cay-johnston/

    2v167x.jpg
     
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  12. ROXRAN

    ROXRAN Contributing Member

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    Can anyone explain what Trump did that necessitated Rogers to cover for him? And they probably will get him on the tax thing, probably 50 percent of the population could be gotten on that if a state government wanted to look hard enough
     
  13. KingCheetah

    KingCheetah Contributing Member

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    @AnnAlthouse
     
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  14. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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  15. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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    Robert Mueller: Roger Stone remains a convicted felon, and rightly so

    Robert S. Mueller III served as special counsel for the Justice Department from 2017 to 2019.

    The work of the special counsel’s office — its report, indictments, guilty pleas and convictions — should speak for itself. But I feel compelled to respond both to broad claims that our investigation was illegitimate and our motives were improper, and to specific claims that Roger Stone was a victim of our office. The Russia investigation was of paramount importance. Stone was prosecuted and convicted because he committed federal crimes. He remains a convicted felon, and rightly so.

    Russia’s actions were a threat to America’s democracy. It was critical that they be investigated and understood. By late 2016, the FBI had evidence that the Russians had signaled to a Trump campaign adviser that they could assist the campaign through the anonymous release of information damaging to the Democratic candidate. And the FBI knew that the Russians had done just that: Beginning in July 2016, WikiLeaks released emails stolen by Russian military intelligence officers from the Clinton campaign. Other online personas using false names — fronts for Russian military intelligence — also released Clinton campaign emails.

    Following FBI Director James B. Comey’s termination in May 2017, the acting attorney general named me as special counsel and directed the special counsel’s office to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. The order specified lines of investigation for us to pursue, including any links or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump campaign. One of our cases involved Stone, an official on the campaign until mid-2015 and a supporter of the campaign throughout 2016. Stone became a central figure in our investigation for two key reasons: He communicated in 2016 with individuals known to us to be Russian intelligence officers, and he claimed advance knowledge of WikiLeaks’ release of emails stolen by those Russian intelligence officers.

    We now have a detailed picture of Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election. The special counsel’s office identified two principal operations directed at our election: hacking and dumping Clinton campaign emails, and an online social media campaign to disparage the Democratic candidate. We also identified numerous links between the Russian government and Trump campaign personnel — Stone among them. We did not establish that members of the Trump campaign conspired with the Russian government in its activities. The investigation did, however, establish that the Russian government perceived it would benefit from a Trump presidency and worked to secure that outcome. It also established that the campaign expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts.

    Uncovering and tracing Russian outreach and interference activities was a complex task. The investigation to understand these activities took two years and substantial effort. Based on our work, eight individuals pleaded guilty or were convicted at trial, and more than two dozen Russian individuals and entities, including senior Russian intelligence officers, were charged with federal crimes.

    Congress also investigated and sought information from Stone. A jury later determined he lied repeatedly to members of Congress. He lied about the identity of his intermediary to WikiLeaks. He lied about the existence of written communications with his intermediary. He lied by denying he had communicated with the Trump campaign about the timing of WikiLeaks’ releases. He in fact updated senior campaign officials repeatedly about WikiLeaks. And he tampered with a witness, imploring him to stonewall Congress.

    The jury ultimately convicted Stone of obstruction of a congressional investigation, five counts of making false statements to Congress and tampering with a witness. Because his sentence has been commuted, he will not go to prison. But his conviction stands.

    Russian efforts to interfere in our political system, and the essential question of whether those efforts involved the Trump campaign, required investigation. In that investigation, it was critical for us (and, before us, the FBI) to obtain full and accurate information. Likewise, it was critical for Congress to obtain accurate information from its witnesses. When a subject lies to investigators, it strikes at the core of the government’s efforts to find the truth and hold wrongdoers accountable. It may ultimately impede those efforts.

    We made every decision in Stone’s case, as in all our cases, based solely on the facts and the law and in accordance with the rule of law. The women and men who conducted these investigations and prosecutions acted with the highest integrity. Claims to the contrary are false.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/07/11/mueller-stone-oped/?arc404=true
     
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  16. RayRay10

    RayRay10 Houstonian
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    In a normal world, they would...but the Dems, and the country can’t afford it. Mitch will sit on it, drag it out and keep Dem senators from campaigning in their districts.

    It’s not just about Trump...the Senate has to be won for their to be any change in our government.
     
  17. gifford1967

    gifford1967 Contributing Member
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  18. Buck Turgidson

    Buck Turgidson Mineshaft Enthusiast

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    He loves Hispanics so let's just call it RICO.
     
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  19. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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    A second republican senator (Romney being the first) speaks out against trump's commutation of roger stone's sentence...

    GOP senator says Trump commuting Stone was a 'mistake'
    https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/506905-gop-senator-says-trump-commuting-stone-was-a-mistake
     
  20. gifford1967

    gifford1967 Contributing Member
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    SUAVE
     
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