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TRIBUTE: Ausmus Homers In Last Astro Game

Discussion in 'Houston Astros' started by Gene the PIG, Sep 28, 2008.

  1. Gene the PIG

    Gene the PIG Member

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    Please don't bend, I mean BLEND this thread, Castor Kastor. I beg you.

    This is not for the twenty year-olds. This is FOR the old-school schoolers ... Those who have known BA since his olden days.


    We've been up, we've been down. IRONIC as to the last day of his ASTROS existance:

    Bot 3rd: Houston
    - B. Ausmus homered to deep left, J. Castillo scored


    GOD BLESS BRAD AUSMUS, & his Houston Astro career. What he lacked in bat, he made up for in spirit & defense. I for one, want to honor Brad for this ... his last game as a Houston Astro.

    & he homered. :)
     
  2. Landlord Landry

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    whatev. good ridiance Brad. great man, less than mediocre baseball player.

    Glad he homered, but I am even more happy he's leaving.
     
  3. Gene the PIG

    Gene the PIG Member

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    LOL

    I hear ya.


    But he still deserves his own thread.


    Even if it's just the friends & free agents he brought here.

    Honestly, I hope he's manager one day. They say he'll be a good one.
     
  4. arkoe

    arkoe (ง'̀-'́)ง

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    Good article in the Chronicle today.

    Commentary: Ausmus set to play final game for Astros
    By RICHARD JUSTICE Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle
    Sept. 27, 2008, 8:09PM

    Few players have been more respected by teammates or more popular. In the most basic ways, Brad Ausmus couldn’t have a simpler legacy.

    He’s smart and funny, honest and decent. He has an easygoing personality that wears well during a long season, and that’s one of many reasons he’ll someday be a terrific manager.

    That personality is one of a long list of things the Astros are going to miss as Ausmus says goodbye to the franchise this afternoon by playing in his 1,259th and final game for Houston.

    He hasn’t ruled out playing an 18th season if a team in Southern California is interested in his catching. Otherwise, this is it.

    Ausmus signed his first professional contract 21 years ago after the Yankees agreed to a schedule that would allow him to take a full load at Dartmouth.

    He received a degree in government in 1991 and was in the big leagues for good in 1993. Now at 39, with a career that includes three Gold Gloves, five trips to the playoffs and lots of laughs, he’s ready for a lifestyle that will allow him to see more of his family.

    Drayton McLane often has referred to Jeff Bagwell and Craig Biggio as “the heart and soul of the Astros.” Truth be told, Ausmus should have been included in that group, because that’s how he was perceived by teammates, managers, coaches, clubhouse personnel, etc.

    Once upon a time, it was impossible to imagine the Astros without the three of them. They had lockers in the middle of the clubhouse, not because of their position of leadership, but because that’s where the TV was.

    They were among the first to arrive and the last to leave, and through the years, they playfully critiqued everyone and everything. Along the way, they became the foundation for teams that were respected around the big leagues for how much they won and how they went about their business.

    Ausmus, the last of them to go, was hard to appreciate in terms of numbers. To focus on a career .251 batting average is to miss his true value.

    Good with pitchers

    Pitching is a game of rhythm and confidence. It’s believing in the pitch you’re throwing. Ausmus is brilliant at getting pitchers into the right frame of mind.

    He also knows hitters, umpires and situations better than almost anyone. Pitchers who have worked with him, from Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte to Brad Lidge and Roy Oswalt, rave about the comfort level of having him behind the plate.

    He had the glove skills of an accomplished shortstop and somehow got pitchers to understand the importance of holding runners. Yes, most bases are stolen off the pitcher.

    People point to his offense, but the best teams Ausmus played on were the ones Gerry Hunsicker designed around defense at short (Adam Everett) and catcher.

    In a perfect world, Johnny Bench would be the catcher, Derek Jeter the shortstop. It’s a fantasy league world, and Ausmus’ numbers don’t play in a fantasy league.

    Just check out how many really good teams he played on and ask teammates if he had a significant role. Veteran pitchers leaned on him. Youngsters trusted him.

    The Astros figured they would be better off without him when they traded him to Detroit after the disappointing 1998 season. Two years later, they got him back.

    My colleague Jerome Solomon was struck the other night at the activity around Ausmus in the Astros’ clubhouse.

    “When you get a club, I’ll play for you,” pitcher Wesley Wright told him. “I’ll go to war for you any day.”

    Outfielder Reggie Abercrombie approached to ask if he was at fault for being doubled off base. Ausmus broke down the play, explaining it was more a case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

    “Thanks,” Abercrombie told him. “Hearing it from you makes me feel so much better.”

    Those of us outside the clubhouse will remember how he made us laugh. Once when negotiating a contract for Biggio, Tim Purpura got an e-mail from Ausmus.

    “It would be a big help if you’d pay him $1 less than you’re paying me,” it said. “I’d like to have that to hold over him the whole season.”

    Bagwell once said: “Craig doesn’t speak to Brad about half the year.”

    Why?

    “Brad knows exactly what to say.”

    Like?

    “Nice at-bat, Craig.”

    I ask Biggio about this.

    “Brad is never wrong,” he said. “Just ask him.”

    Keen sense of humor

    Ausmus wasn’t serious all that often. He mostly made people laugh. Like when I threatened to not vote for him for the Hall of Fame if he didn’t become more cooperative.

    “So now you’re going to keep me out of the Hall of Fame?” he said. “I think I’ve done a pretty good job of that myself.”

    There was the spring he was lugging around a book titled A Schopenhauerian Critique of Nietzsche’s Thought: Toward a Restoration of Metaphysics (Studies in the History of Philosophy).

    His dad, Harry J. Ausmus, wrote it, and with a spring visit coming up, the good son was poring over it to liven up the dinner conversation.

    When I told him I knew a little something about Nietzsche, Ausmus rolled his eyes.

    “Sure you do,” he said.

    “Out of chaos comes order,” I said.

    He seemed stunned.

    “It’s in Blazing Saddles,” I said.

    Ausmus had a sense of his place in the game. He knew what he was, and more important, what he wasn’t.

    “Offense,” he once said, “has always been hard for me. From my first day in pro ball, offense was hard.”

    He said this during a long batting slump, a slump that challenged him mentally and physically.

    Mostly, though, Ausmus was one of those guys who got everything out of his talent that was there to be gotten.

    He has had a great run, making dozens of friends and leaving with the admiration of those who knew him best.

    He’ll be back at some point as a manager, coach or front-office type.

    The Red Sox have a position waiting for him. McLane would hire him in a heartbeat.

    For now, Ausmus is focused on going home to San Diego, resting and reconnecting with his family.

    He played with grace and dignity, with humor and smarts. I asked if he was going to cry today.

    “No,” he said.

    Some of the rest of us just might.
     
  5. DaDakota

    DaDakota If you want to know, just ask!
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    Great defensive player earlier in his career and very smart throughout....I hope he stays as a bench coach.

    DD
     
  6. astros148

    astros148 Member

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    i hope he teaches kids how not to hit into a double play as thats all he ever did in his life
     
  7. arkoe

    arkoe (ง'̀-'́)ง

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    Like the time he sent that game against the Braves in the playoffs into extra innings?
     
  8. kaleidosky

    kaleidosky Your Tweety Bird dance just cost us a run

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    Ausmus had a solid career here as a defender and pitch-caller until his arm started fading and all.. never much with the bat, but he did have his share of clutch HR's (i think his HR clinched the division against the cubs way back in.. '97?)

    I remember back when he started his first stint with us, I got his AOL screen name (in the days of AOL, before AIM was its own application) and talked to him online / e-mailed with him about baseball. I was a teenager, and it was pretty damn cool to be IMing/e-mailing with a pro baseball player and getting tips/info
     
  9. Gene the PIG

    Gene the PIG Member

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    ^^^LAME^^^

    You obviously don't understand a TRIBUTE.

    Now back to Myspace with you, homo.
     
  10. Gene the PIG

    Gene the PIG Member

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    In my tardiness, I was talking to ASTROS 148 on Myspace.
     
  11. pgabriel

    pgabriel Educated Negro

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    kinda like teddy ballgame
     
  12. astros148

    astros148 Member

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    or the tons of seasons he batted .231 and 31 rbi's or w/e sad number he had.

    he had some big playoff hits, remember the time against the bravies in 2000 or 2001 when he hit that double off the crawford boxes to tie the game
     
  13. Gene the PIG

    Gene the PIG Member

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    According to 148 Linden St. He was born &^ he bounced into double-plays.


    NOT TRUE


    We wouldn't have made it to a WORLD SERIES, hadn't it been for BA & his BAT, dummy.


    FACT
    PWNED


    Check your Myspace bulletins, & your Wikipedia carnel knowledge.
     
  14. astros148

    astros148 Member

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    not true
     
  15. Gene the PIG

    Gene the PIG Member

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    These are the same people responding, that think that The Texans will beat the Titans every year, right? :rolleyes: OK ... that explains alot.

    Brad Ausmus is a HOUSTON ASTROS LEGEND.
     
  16. Gene the PIG

    Gene the PIG Member

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    TRUE


    TRUE


    TRUE
     
  17. Landlord Landry

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    while I rarely agree with the tool that is astros148, I do think he's right, his on field career, whether at the plate or behind it, Asmus is hardly worth a 'tribute'. that has nothing to do with age either. you don't see anyone here giving a tribute to adam everett.
     
  18. astros148

    astros148 Member

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    lol @ calling me a tool when you're on kubiacks nuts. Howd you like that missed timeout in the first half?
     
  19. Landlord Landry

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    I think very few will agree with you.

    I understand the whole 'good guy' soft spot you have for Ausmus, but for 2-3 years he had one of, if not the lowest OBP of any player in the entire NL. far from legendary.
     
  20. Landlord Landry

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    I wouldn't piss on you if you were on fire, so I'm not gonna engage with you on here.
     

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