1. Welcome! Please take a few seconds to create your free account to post threads, make some friends, remove a few ads while surfing and much more. ClutchFans has been bringing fans together to talk Houston Sports since 1996. Join us!

Taiwan Protests

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by SacTown, Mar 19, 2014.

  1. jdhu

    jdhu Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Messages:
    236
    Likes Received:
    20
    Case in point (DPP militancy).
     
  2. jdhu

    jdhu Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Messages:
    236
    Likes Received:
    20
    Yeah, maybe because they are further removed from the mainlaind heritage, but I have noticed a lot of DPP supporters seem to look down on mainland Chinese.
     
  3. jdhu

    jdhu Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Messages:
    236
    Likes Received:
    20
    Yeah, in a way, status quo is the only choice for Taiwan. Obviously, unification with a nominally communist country (I think we can fairly say an authoritarian system) isn't a possibility. Formal independence means war, and Taiwan would likely have to go it alone. Thus, the status quo, with hopes that closer economic times and a maturing mainland society will make unification on Taiwan's terms possible.
     
  4. WinorLoseMate

    WinorLoseMate Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,072
    Likes Received:
    291
    So I was speaking to my Taiwanese friend and he thought a trade agreement between Taiwan and China would be a good thing. He believed it would benefit Taiwan's economy more than China's, as China has many more large important trading partners. Do these students not have a clue that their future livelihoods can be improved by a better economy?
     
  5. jdhu

    jdhu Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Messages:
    236
    Likes Received:
    20
    To me, it's pretty basic Econ, and I think it is largely irrelevant which side stands to gain more (I would also guess Taiwan, on a per capita basis). If I gain $10 from trade and you gain $20, I should still want to trade, right?

    If "going it alone" were the best way to economic growth, then we should simply restrict trade between the states, and we will all be rich...:rolleyes:

    Anyway, as mentioned, it is really a shame about the students, because it seems like they are being manipulated, and they are actually protesting against their own prosperity. My father lives in Taiwan (a KMT supporter), and he says that the proportion of students protesting is tiny, and that they are from a few universities (that are known to be DPP bastions).
     
  6. bingsha10

    bingsha10 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    Messages:
    3,118
    Likes Received:
    308
    I think their reply would be that strengthening ties to the mainland would be a negative externality.
     
  7. zoids

    zoids Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    377
    Likes Received:
    7
    Things that you are right: Lots of people don't want to be anything related to China

    Thing that you are absolutely wrong: Because they aren't ethnically Han Chinese.

    Taiwan is Han Chinese, their ancestors are fishermen settlers from the southern China which is Han origin. Then when KMT fled to Taiwan, most of the KMT is Han Chinese if not all... In conclusion, all Taiwan is Han Chinese.

    The only reason why they want no part of China is because of political system and beliefs and freedom.
     
  8. KingLeoric

    KingLeoric Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Messages:
    2,736
    Likes Received:
    803
    It's happening!
    [​IMG]
     
  9. KingCheetah

    KingCheetah Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2002
    Messages:
    56,594
    Likes Received:
    48,621
    The “Battle of Taipei” Shows Just How Wary of China Young Taiwanese Are

    Taipei police used batons and water cannon to clear protestors from Taiwan’s parliament Monday morning.

    The mostly student protestors say the deal hands too much influence to China, is undemocratic, and will hurt the island. The government insists it is an economic imperative. By early Monday, people were being pulled from the premises. At least 58 were arrested and 137 were injured, reports the Associated Press.

    The Taiwanese Parliament Is Being Occupied by Protesters Unhappy With a China-Trade PactPapier-Mâché Pandas Are Taking Over the WorldMen Charged With Toppling Ancient Rock Formation Avoid Jail Time Huffington PostHere's An Updated Tally Of All The People Who Have Ever Died From A mar1juana Overdose Huffington PostReese Witherspoon's Ballin' Birthday, Ciara's Star-Studded Baby Shower & More Weekend News People

    The scenes of violence seem out of place — for the movement, and for modern-day Taiwan. The student-led campaign gained momentum last week, when a group of demonstrators occupied parts of the parliament in Taipei. They are pushing for a further review of the Trade in Services Agreement, (TiSA), a deal that will open certain service sectors to investment from China, and vice versa. The demonstrators spent much of the last week gathered around the parliament chanting and waving colorful cardboard signs. They are mostly young, and their methods largely peaceful. Their emblem is a sunflower, symbol of hope.

    The bloody scene in Taipei harkens back to a different, darker era. On Feb. 28, 1947, the nationalist Kuomintang, violently suppressed anti-government protests, killing over 10,000. Almost four decades of martial law followed. It was not until 1986 that an opposition party, the Democratic Progressive Party, emerged and a democracy slowly took root.

    Taiwan’s democracy has deepened and grown since, giving rise to a political culture where people take seriously their right to vote and protest. To some Chinese, particularly in Hong Kong and Macau, Taiwan is a model. The island’s 2012 presidential poll was closely watched by both Special Administrative Regions. At polling stations in downtown Taipei, I met election tourists who had flown from Hong Kong to see what they called a “preview” of Chinese democracy in action.

    To the young people and opposition party supporters gathered in Taipei, TiSA is another step toward China, and a step too far. They also worry that this latest round of economic liberalization will hurt small and medium-sized businesses on the island. More fundamentally, they see TiSA as a sign of Sinification, and worry President Ma and the ruling Kuomintang are to keen to trade away the island’s hard-earned, democratic gains.

    President Ma’s and his government say the trade deal will bolster the economy and keep Taiwan competitive with countries like South Korea. Addressing demonstrators on Sunday, he applauded their passion, but questioned the decision to occupy government offices. “Is this the sort of democracy we want?” he asked. “Must the rule of law be sacrificed in such a manner? Do we not take pride in our democracy and our respect for rule of law?”

    The battle for Taipei has no doubt caught the attention of officials and ordinary people across the Taiwan Strait. The ruling Chinese Communist Party tightly controls the press and censors discussion of sensitive subjects, including Taiwan, from the country’s widely popular mircoblogs, so the reaction has been somewhat muted. A few applauded the students. Most posts that made it through the censors were critical: “This isn’t the democracy we want,” was the refrain.

    But it is Taiwan’s democracy, for better and for worse. And, as the past week’s events show, young Taiwanese will fight for it.

    link
     
  10. KingLeoric

    KingLeoric Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Messages:
    2,736
    Likes Received:
    803
    Hope those students can save Taiwan like the protestors saved Ukraine.
     
  11. pirc1

    pirc1 Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2002
    Messages:
    13,972
    Likes Received:
    1,702
    百无一用是书生
    You cannot count on students to accomplish anything.
     
    #51 pirc1, Mar 24, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2014

Share This Page

  • About ClutchFans

    Since 1996, ClutchFans has been loud and proud covering the Houston Rockets, helping set an industry standard for team fan sites. The forums have been a home for Houston sports fans as well as basketball fanatics around the globe.

  • Support ClutchFans!

    If you find that ClutchFans is a valuable resource for you, please consider becoming a Supporting Member. Supporting Members can upload photos and attachments directly to their posts, customize their user title and more. Gold Supporters see zero ads!


    Upgrade Now