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Microfracture surgery. A good read.

Discussion in 'Houston Rockets: Game Action & Roster Moves' started by RMGEEGEE, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. RMGEEGEE

    RMGEEGEE Contributing Member

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    I became curious to see exactly what it was, so I checked out Wikipedia lol.
    Very interesting as it related the process to many professional athletes.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microfracture_surgery
    Here's the main points:
    "Microfracture surgery is one of the articular cartilage repair surgical techniques that works by creating tiny fractures in the underlying bone. This causes new cartilage to develop from a so-called super-clot. Microfracture surgery has gained a profile in the sports world in recent years; numerous professional athletes including members of the NBA (most notably Greg Oden and Amar'e Stoudemire), NFL and NHL have undergone the procedure.

    Use in professional sports

    There have been many notable professional athletes who have undergone the procedure. Partially because of the high level of stress placed on the knees by these athletes, the surgery is not a panacea and results have been mixed. Many players' careers effectively end despite the surgery. However, some players such as Jason Kidd, Steve Yzerman, John Stockton and Zach Randolph [2] have been able to return at or near their pre-surgery form while players Brian Grant, Antonio McDyess, Chris Webber, Allan Houston and Penny Hardaway never regained their old form. Others such as Jamal Mashburn and Terrell Brandon never recovered and retired. Portland Trail Blazers rookie Greg Oden underwent the procedure in early September 2007 and missed the entire 2007-2008 NBA season. At only 19 at the time of the surgery, doctors are confident that he will return to at or near full strength by the 2008-2009 season. [12]

    In October 2005, young star Amare Stoudemire of the NBA's Phoenix Suns underwent one of the highest-profile microfracture surgeries to date. He returned to the court in March 2006 and initially appeared to have made a full recovery, but subsequently started feeling stiffness in both knees (his right knee had been overcompensating for the injured left knee). He and the team doctor decided he needed more time to rehab and he did not return until the 2006-2007 NBA season.[13] During the 2006-2007 season, Stoudemire returned to form, averaging 20.4 points and 9.6 rebounds per game while playing in all 82 regular-season games and the 2007 NBA All-Star Game. His recent success has brought positive publicity to the procedure, further distancing it from a previous reputation as a possible "career death sentence" in the sports world, though he was one of the youngest of the aforementioned players to undergo the surgery. [14]

    [edit] Recovery

    Current studies have shown a success rate of 75 to 80 percent among patients 45 years of age or younger, even among professional athletes.[3][5] With the help of physical therapy, patients can often return to sports (or other intense activities) in about four months. However, this is a best-case scenario and depends on the severity of the cartilage damage (and any other conditions existing in the knee). Normal patients and professional athletes who play at the highest level however are quite different, as Chris Webber, who underwent the surgery, has stated that a full recovery in four months is nearly impossible. Webber returned to the NBA eight months after his surgery but was never the same.[15] Microfracture surgery itself is relatively minor. It is an outpatient procedure and causes only small discomfort. The harder part is the restrictions that are placed on the patient during the post-operative recovery period. This can be a major challenge for many patients. For optimal re-growth of joint surface, the patients need to be very patient and also extremely cooperative. They usually need to be on crutches for four to six weeks (sometimes longer). Sometimes a brace is needed. This all depends on the size and/or location of the joint surface defect that is being repaired or regenerated. The patients are encouraged to spend approximately 6-8 hours a day on a CPM (Continuous Passive Motion) machine that helps with optimal re-growth of joint surface. Patients usually feel pretty good and think they can avoid these critically important steps, and even start running and jumping (or playing sports) before the internal aspects of the knee, and the joint surface, are ready."
     
  2. RedRowdy111

    RedRowdy111 Contributing Member

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    I'm so f'n pissed right now, I cant see this as a good read, wtf.

    Someone hit Mcgrady with a shovel.
     
  3. RMGEEGEE

    RMGEEGEE Contributing Member

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    Excuse me. Interesting*
     
  4. bratna8

    bratna8 Member

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    Nets fans should've been reading this. :rolleyes:
     
  5. yao123

    yao123 Member

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    someone please go break my leg for 21m i would be so happy...and man...gonna spent only 100k fixing it...please do not mention the name tmac anymore...pretty sure he will go down in history as someone we dont even give a dam about....sorry, but this **** is frustrating
     
  6. TheGreat

    TheGreat Member

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    Microfracture Knee Surgery Information

    Can someone tell me how long it takes to recover from this injury. I know a lot of players of had it (JKidd, Amare, Oden) but can someone give me a lesson about this injury. It would be highly appreciated!
     
  7. DaDakota

    DaDakota If you want to know, just ask!

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    I posted a link in another thread but here ya go

    The Surgery:

    Microfracture surgery is one of the articular cartilage repair surgical techniques that works by creating tiny fractures in the underlying bone. This causes new cartilage to develop from a so-called super-clot. Microfracture surgery has gained a profile in the sports world in recent years; numerous professional athletes including members of the NBA (most notably Greg Oden and Amar'e Stoudemire), NFL and NHL have undergone the procedure.

    The surgery is quick (taking as short as 30 minutes but it is not unusual to take as long as 90 minutes), is minimally invasive, and can have a significantly shorter recovery time than an arthroplasty (knee replacement). Combined with a high rate of success, these factors have caused orthopedic surgeons to use the procedure with increasing frequency.

    The Recovery:

    Current studies have shown a success rate of 75 to 80 percent among patients 45 years of age or younger, even among professional athletes.[3][5] With the help of physical therapy, patients can often return to sports (or other intense activities) in about four months. However, this is a best-case scenario and depends on the severity of the cartilage damage (and any other conditions existing in the knee). Normal patients and professional athletes who play at the highest level however are quite different, as Chris Webber, who underwent the surgery, has stated that a full recovery in four months is nearly impossible. Webber returned to the NBA eight months after his surgery but was never the same.[15] Microfracture surgery itself is relatively minor. It is an outpatient procedure and causes only small discomfort. The harder part is the restrictions that are placed on the patient during the post-operative recovery period. This can be a major challenge for many patients. For optimal re-growth of joint surface, the patients need to be very patient and also extremely cooperative. They usually need to be on crutches for four to six weeks (sometimes longer). Sometimes a brace is needed. This all depends on the size and/or location of the joint surface defect that is being repaired or regenerated. The patients are encouraged to spend approximately 6-8 hours a day on a CPM (Continuous Passive Motion) machine that helps with optimal re-growth of joint surface. Patients usually feel pretty good and think they can avoid these critically important steps, and even start running and jumping (or playing sports) before the internal aspects of the knee, and the joint surface, are ready.





    DD
     
  8. TheGreat

    TheGreat Member

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    Thanks DD, hopefully T-Mac recovers and the Rockets get to the playoffs this year.
     
  9. TesseracT

    TesseracT Member

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    6-8 hours a day?

    For how long?
     
  10. rocketsmetalspd

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    Yeah right, TMac will not be ready this playoff run. TMac is done, face it if he could not get healthy after the minor surgery he already had.
     
  11. TheGreat

    TheGreat Member

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    I meant he recovers by atleast the beginning of next year BUT I hope the Rockets still make the playoffs this year.
     
  12. TheGreat

    TheGreat Member

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    If T-Mac wants to fully recover from this injury, he needs to REHAB this time completely. He can't mess around or he will be done for good. T-Mac, I hope your reading this thread and you better rehab your ass off after you get surgery. This isn't a surgery you can mess around with.
     
  13. Coog

    Coog Member

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    I actually had this surgery back in July of '07. I had torn a quarter-sized piece of cartilage and had it removed and the microfracture procedure done to "replace" the cartilage. Since my lost cartilage was toward the back of the knee and not in a load-bearing area, my rehab and initial recovery time was two months, not four. However, I would definitely believe a four-month minimum before resuming regular activity if the injury is in a more critical area.

    Now, granted--I'm in my 40's, so I wouldn't recover as soon as a professional athlete. But, I can tell you--my knee didn't feel completely right until 18 months after the procedure. I've been able to play basketball for about a year (started back about 6 months after the surgery) and I've only felt comfortable without a brace on the court for the last couple of months.
     
  14. nolimitnp

    nolimitnp Contributing Member

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    That's a tad extreme. I understand everyone's frustration, but its not T-Mac's fault the injury didn't heal correctly.
     

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