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METRO meeting June 18 regarding halting of transit expansion

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout' started by da1, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. da1

    da1 Member

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    Show up! Tell Metro's board you want transit!

    Metro's board wants to hear citizen comments about whether or not to halt transit expansion for many years in order to continue the diversion of hundreds of millions of sales tax dollars to 15 cities and Harris County. On June 18, from 6-8 pm, show up at 1900 Main to speak your piece - we need about 200 people!

    We hope you'll agree that it is in the best interests of all the cities - especially the City of Houston - to invest that money in improving the quality of life and increasing the tax base through the rising property values and sales taxes that could occur around the new transit stations.

    Corporations want transit in Uptown/Galleria
    Uptown District CEO John Breeding told Metro's board "we are talking to corporations who are seeking space today and transit is paramount for them." Let's face it: as far as traffic goes, the Galleria area is full. Growth of that economy requires transit.

    Interesting agreements for three area cities
    Three cities in the Metro area have special arrangements with Metro to receive funds from the transit sales tax. Missouri City, Katy, and Humble threatened Metro in the legislature in 1997 and Metro then agreed to returning half the sales tax to them.

    Incredible shrinking Metro
    Strapped for funds, Metro's bus fleet has been shrinking. Metro chairman Gilbert Garcia told a Greater Houston Partnership transportation committee that "buses have diminished from about 1400 to about 1200." This implies service is shrinking too - as population increases.

    What's at stake
    With no money for additional transit, the central urban rail system that is necessary to enable a serious regional transit system that connects to jobs is threatened. People commuting by transit from the edges of the region need that service to get around when they arrive at work.

    http://us1.campaign-archive2.com/?u=eec237167293af5bc017cf80b&id=08edd61af9
     
  2. SwoLy-D

    SwoLy-D Contributing Member

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    I'll be there to tell METRO that I want more rail, a high speed train to other cities, less polluting buses, and naked pictures of Bea Arthur! :eek:
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. da1

    da1 Member

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    Me too
     
  4. geeimsobored

    geeimsobored Contributing Member

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    Seriously the counties are robbing Metro blind with this nonsense. Citizens are paying those taxes for transportation. I wish I were in town because I would definitely be there.
     
  5. da1

    da1 Member

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    Hopefully there is a referendum in November. The funny thing is once transit shows up plenty of people will take it.
     
  6. SwoLy-D

    SwoLy-D Contributing Member

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    :eek: The funny thing is how people don't vote YES on things that aren't directly affecting them. For example, most people will say: "What? A rail? Does it come my way? NO? OK. So I will vote against it because they're using my tax money."

    Dudes, you gotta start somewhere. :(

    Anyway, this belongs in the D&D.
     
  7. Xerobull

    Xerobull Contributing Member

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    You guys who go: Tell Metro to keep Homeland Security the **** off the bus lines.
     
  8. bigtexxx

    bigtexxx Contributing Member

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    if they spend money, put it into buses, perhaps even more limited-stop express buses -- don't piss money down the toilet trying to fit a train to a city that was designed for a car. Waste of money
     
  9. Sajan

    Sajan Member

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    how fast will these metro rails go? 2mph? THEN NO.

    watching the damn rail go from medical center to UH downtown is painful. hell, skip some stops..make it where train A covers x amount of stops, train b covers the rest etc.
     
  10. da1

    da1 Member

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    Bus rapid transit is ok for a limited time, but it's not the long term answer. Bogota figured that out.
     
  11. krosfyah

    krosfyah Contributing Member

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    The question isn't if they should spend money on trains or buses.

    The question is should we divert COH dollars to spend on road improvement projects in, say, Hedwig Villiage. Metro's contention is Hedwig Villiage receives far more of our tax dollars than they contribute.
     
  12. Scarface281

    Scarface281 Contributing Member

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    If politicians like Tom Delay and John Culberson, plus the COH and the counties, didn't rob Metro of funds (and really, if COH residents didn't vote down rail the first time in the 80s), then the system would be much better. Houston had rails all over the place before it was ripped up and used as material for WWII. If done right, with things like elevated overpasses over busy streets, then it would work fine. It already has the second highest riders per mile.
     
  13. coolweather

    coolweather Contributing Member

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    i would luv to go, but why 6Pm?
     
  14. Xsatyr

    Xsatyr Member

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    Maybe their just planning for the future. Houston is a sprawling mess, very inefficient and costly.
     
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  15. mfastx

    mfastx Member

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    Buses are a waste of money. If you knew anything about transit, you'd know that buses are less efficient than rail, carry less riders, and are far inferior.

    Buses are wasting more of our taxpayer dollars than rail would, that is a fact.
     
  16. mfastx

    mfastx Member

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    Oh, and good to see some HAIFers here :grin:
     
  17. Xsatyr

    Xsatyr Member

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    Skyscrapercity and skyscraperpage are sites def worth checking out too.
     
  18. coolweather

    coolweather Contributing Member

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    have you ever been in a park n ride?
     
  19. Dubious

    Dubious Contributing Member

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    Houston already is what it is. We might have had a monorail system that made some sense but Bob and his Real Estate buddies ridiculed it to death (and Mayor Whitmire) so they could profit. The street car is an anachronism that has minimal effect over 500 square miles. Urban Land Institute studies show the maximum walking distance most pedestrians will go is 1500 feet (and I don't think they considered 100 degree heat and 60 days of rain a year). Draw a 1500 foot line around the (slow, cumbersome) street car and see what percentage of the city is effected.

    Houston is a car town. Increasing the efficiency and safety of auto traffic makes the most sense. If politics really worked, our city would invest in natural gas powered electric generation and an electric car factory.
     
  20. Xsatyr

    Xsatyr Member

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    Do you really think a city can do that??? Making a switch to electric cars has to be done on a national scale. It is going to take a lot of money and support from the government to get car manufacturers to make that switch.

    Also Houston is what it is? Everything changes over time, cities are not excluded. Adaptability is a part of life.
     

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