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Majority of Americans Concerned about Cuts Willing to Raise Taxes on Rich

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by rocketsjudoka, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. rocketsjudoka

    rocketsjudoka Contributing Member
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    Some interesting results from the latest NBC / WSJ Poll. Some key parts bolded.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41876558/ns/politics

    NBC/WSJ poll: Voters deficit-worried but wary of cuts
    Americans adamantly opposed to cuts in Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, K-12 education

    WASHINGTON — As politicians in Washington — and across the country — seek to cut spending to reduce their budget deficits, the latest NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll finds that the American public is divided about how far they should go.

    In the poll, eight in 10 respondents say they are concerned about the growing federal deficit and the national debt, but more than 60 percent — including key swing-voter groups — are concerned that major cuts from Congress could impact their lives and their families.

    What’s more, while Americans find some budget cuts acceptable, they are adamantly opposed to cuts in Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security and K-12 education.


    And although a combined 22 percent of poll-takers name the deficit/government spending as the top issue the federal government should address, 37 percent believe job creation/economic growth is the No. 1 issue.

    Republican pollster Bill McInturff, who conducted the survey with Democratic pollster Peter D. Hart, says these results are a “cautionary sign” for a Republican Party pursuing deep budget cuts.

    He points out that the Americans who are most concerned about spending cuts are core Republicans and Tea Party supporters, not independents and swing voters.

    “It may be hard to understand why a person might jump off a cliff, unless you understand they’re being chased by a tiger,” he said. “That tiger is the Tea Party.”

    GOP vs. swing-voter groups
    For instance: 33 percent of Tea Party supporters, 34 percent of Republicans and 35 percent of voters backing John McCain in the last presidential election, list deficit/spending as the top issue the federal government should address — compared with 23 percent of independents, 24 percent of suburban women, 19 percent of seniors and 19 percent of those aged 18 to 34.

    By contrast, 35 percent of seniors, 39 percent of 18- to 34-year-olds, 40 percent of independents and 41 percent of suburban women believe job creation/economic growth is the nation's top issue.

    And two-thirds of independents, seniors, 18- to 34-year-olds and suburban women say they are concerned that major cuts to government spending could impact them and their families. Roughly half of Republicans, McCain voters and Tea Party supporters express the same concern.

    In the spending showdown between congressional Democrats and Republicans, only 25 percent believe the disagreement over the budget will lead to a shutdown of the federal government. A whopping 71 percent believe that lawmakers will reach an agreement to avert a shutdown.

    Read the full poll results here (.pdf)

    Indeed, The Senate on Wednesday cleared legislation — which the House passed the day before — to extend government funding until March 18. The measure, which President Barack Obama signed into law Wednesday afternoon, included $4 billion in budget cuts, but the stopgap bill tees up another potential impasse in two weeks.

    Whom will the public blame if there is a shutdown after March 18 or beyond? In the poll, 21 percent said Obama and the congressional Democrats would be responsible for a shutdown, while another 21 percent said congressional Republicans should take the blame. Fifty-seven percent said they would blame both sides equally.

    Popular and unpopular cuts
    The survey — which was conducted Feb. 24-28 of 1,000 adults (200 reached by cell phone), and which has an overall margin of error of plus-minus 3.1 percentage points — also listed 26 different ways to reduce the federal budget deficit.

    The most popular: placing a surtax on federal income taxes for those who make more than $1 million per year (81 percent said that was acceptable), eliminating spending on earmarks (78 percent), eliminating funding for weapons systems the Defense Department says aren’t necessary (76 percent) and eliminating tax credits for the oil and gas industries (74 percent).

    The least popular: cutting funding for Medicaid, the federal government health-care program for the poor (32 percent said that was acceptable); cutting funding for Medicare, the federal government health-care program for seniors (23 percent); cutting funding for K-12 education (22 percent); and cutting funding for Social Security (22 percent).


    Those numbers, GOP pollster McInturff says, “serve as a huge flashing yellow sign to Republicans … if they are going to start to talk about changes to Medicare and Social Security.”

    On Wisconsin and state battles
    Turning to the budget battles taking place in the states, strong majorities say they are comfortable with states requiring their employees to pay more for their retirement and health care to balance budget deficits. But they oppose stripping public employees' collective-bargaining rights, as Republican Gov. Scott Walker is proposing in Wisconsin.

    In the poll, 68 percent find it acceptable to require public employees to contribute more of their pay for retirement benefits; 63 percent are fine with requiring these employees to pay more for their health-care benefits; and 58 percent would be amenable to freezing public employees' salaries for one year.

    However, just 33 percent say it's acceptable — and 62 percent say it's unacceptable — to eliminate some employees’ collective-bargaining rights as way to deal with state budget deficits.

    In addition, 77 percent believe public employees should have the same collective-bargaining rights (when it comes to health care, pensions and other benefits) as union employees who work for private companies.


    On Obama and 2012
    President Obama’s job-approval rating in the poll sits at 48 percent, which is down five points since last month. “If you leave out [the Tucson shootings], the president’s job rating is where it was for most of 2010 — not terrible, not great,” said Hart, the Democratic pollster.

    Against some notable Republicans in a hypothetical general-election presidential contest, Obama leads former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney 49 percent to 40 percent and former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty 50 percent to 31 percent.

    But against a generic Republican, the president’s lead narrows to five points, with 45 percent saying they will “probably vote” for Obama and 40 percent saying they will “probably vote” for the GOP candidate.

    In a hypothetical Republican presidential primary, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee leads the pack as the first choice of 25 percent of GOP primary voters — followed by Romney at 21 percent, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich at 13 percent and former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin at 12 percent.

    Texas Congressman Ron Paul comes in fifth at 6 percent — followed by Pawlenty and Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels at 3 percent, former Sen. Rick Santorum at 2 percent and Jon Huntsman, current U.S. ambassador to China, at 1 percent.

    Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour was the first choice of just one respondent out of the 282 GOP primary voters surveyed.

    The “new normal”
    Obama’s biggest weakness heading into 2012? It’s what Hart calls the “new normal.”

    For instance, just 31 percent believe the nation is headed in the right direction. “We’re now at 20 months [in the NBC/WSJ poll] where we have not been able to break 40 percent [in the] right direction,” Hart said. “Essentially, this country has been in a long swoon.”

    What’s more, only 29 percent of those surveyed think the economy will improve in the next 12 months. That’s down 11 points from January.


    “This is a country that refuses to feel better,” said McInturff.

    And that, Hart added, shapes a 2012 election cycle that could be “very, very close with a lot of challenges left ahead for the president.”

    Mark Murray covers politics for NBC News.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. FranchiseBlade

    FranchiseBlade Contributing Member
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    They were in favor of raising the tax rates on the rich before back when they made the compromise to keep the tax cuts. The only people who aren't willing to do it is Republican lawmakers and a bunch of the wall street billionaires.
     
  3. rhadamanthus

    rhadamanthus Contributing Member

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    So what? The "representatives" of this "majority of Americans" are not willing to raise taxes on the rich and so we continue to bankrupt ourselves for a privileged few.

    The American public has virtually no impact on policy.
     
  4. rocketsjudoka

    rocketsjudoka Contributing Member
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    Except when it comes to voting. This polling data might make US Congressional and state Republicans moderate their positions. If not it might mean the Republican wave of 2010 is short lived.
     
  5. rhadamanthus

    rhadamanthus Contributing Member

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    I don't think you understood my post.
     
  6. Dennis2112

    Dennis2112 Contributing Member

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    And who did they poll, union member homes?

    Democrat likely voters?

    Come on, show WHO you polled and how the question was asked before I believe any poll.

    The top 5% wage earners in this country pay 51% of the total taxes the feds pull in. Considering that almost 40% of the American public don't pay taxes, its understandable they would hate the "big bad rich man". That 40% takes what the other 60% pays in taxes. How is it right or fair that I have to work to pay my bills but other people can just sit around on the government teat without working and suck down all the tax revenue. When does education get some, SS, defense, infrastructure costs, etc. oh that's right lets raise taxes. Of course there are folks that needs some help but that used to be the job of churches and community centers. I am not against welfare but there has to be a cut off for those that actually CAN work.

    Raising taxes is not the answer. Washington takes took much from us hard-working taxpayers. Its never worked anywhere in the history of man. it cannot be sustained.

    Not one government has ever taxed itself into prosperity...period

    Its OUR money , not the government's. I have no issue paying some taxes for the defense of this nation and its people and the running of the government. But to waste from BOTH sides of the aisle is disgusting. Just like a household that is facing tough economic times. Tough decisions have to be made. Some things just can't be budgeted for when there is no money.
     
  7. rimrocker

    rimrocker Contributing Member

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    Welcome to the discussion Mr. Boortz.
     
  8. GladiatoRowdy

    GladiatoRowdy Contributing Member

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    If you really want to find that information, much of it is available if you choose to look. However, you will have to do your own research.

    It is a lie to say that "almost 40% of the American public don't pay taxes." Everyone who works pays payroll tax and the poor and middle class pay a higher percentage of their income in payroll tax than the rich do.

    The number of people who are able to "sit around on the government teat without working" is minuscule.

    Given that a significant reason for our deficit is the tax cuts that have been given over the course of the last 30+ years, raising taxes seems like it should be on the table.

    There are measures in place to make sure that those who can work do. That was a significant part of the welfare reform that Clinton signed into law.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_Responsibility_and_Work_Opportunity_Act

    I would argue that the longest, sustained period of economic growth in our country was the period between 1945 and 1975, a time period when the top marginal tax rate never fell below 70%.

    Our government used to collect enough in taxes to pay its bills. That was the case up until Reagan lowered the tax rates dramatically. Look at the deficit and debt history sometime, it started ballooning under Reagan and only reversed when Bush the elder and Clinton raised taxes.

    Taxes are the price we pay to live in a civilized society. If you prefer to keep your entire paycheck without the government taking any, I hear Somalia is nice this time of year.
     
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  9. SamFisher

    SamFisher Contributing Member

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    You really think that information is being concealed from you, and that a fraud may be being perpetrated upon you? Interesting.

    Are you using AOL to type this post? 56.6k?
     
  10. rimrocker

    rimrocker Contributing Member

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    I'm not as optimistic in your ability to use the Google as other posters. Therefore, I will graciously help you out:

    http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/MSNBC/S..._Politics_Today_Stories_Teases/2-24-28-11.pdf

    There's 20 pages of data. After digesting the information, please come back and tell us you believe the poll or not. And if not, why not?
     
  11. Dennis2112

    Dennis2112 Contributing Member

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    You do realize that there a taxable threashhold that a taxpayer has to meet or he gets ALL of his witheld taxes. So if you make les than a certain, amount, you are not paying nothing already. Welfare precipitants get all of theirs back too.

    Hmmm, sound like there may be more than a miniscule amount NOT paying taxes


    Where is your information that proves this? Is this just a pundit's opinion you heard that sounded cool?

    Tax cuts are NOTthe reason for a deficit. Its the spending. If do NOT spend more than you make, there is no deficit. However, if you want to spend you don't have, the debt comes sooner rather than later.



    Are you referring to the federal government who chooses which laws to enforce?



    And if I remember correctly, didn't we have a huge energy and economic recession and inflation going through the roof in the mid 70's (circa 1975)? That condition was present years before Reagan lowered tax rates. Seems to me that all those years of high taxes finally blew up the system. The lowering of taxes in the 80's is what catapulted us to the being the ONLY superpower in the world whose money is the standard by which the world economy model moves?





    The budget ballooned because of spending , NOT because of lower taxes.

    Lower taxes = higher revenue for the government. Always has, always will.

    Lower taxes means more money to spend and more jobs that need working. Oh and that multiplies the number of people on the tax role. Hmmmm, more people paying taxes means more tax revenue.

    Its a fairly simple equation. Works EVERYTIME.




    The money I earn is mine. Not yours or the government's. Somalia is not the best example to use. It is under Islamic rule where ALL the money you make is the government's
     
  12. geeimsobored

    geeimsobored Contributing Member

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    YEAH! That non-existant Somali government is just stealing the common-man's money. I agree that's a horrible example.
     
  13. DonnyMost

    DonnyMost not wrong
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    Oh boy, I'm going to enjoy watching that steaming pile of crapola get ripped to shreds.
     
  14. rtsy

    rtsy Member

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    The Case Against the Income Tax

    Texas Straight Talk ^ | May 7, 2001 | Congressman Ron Paul

    Posted on Sat May 26 2007 1

    Could America exist without an income tax? The idea seems radical, yet in truth America did just fine without a federal income tax for the first 126 years of its history. Prior to 1913, the government operated with revenues raised through tariffs, excise taxes, and property taxes, without ever touching a worker's paycheck. In the late 1800s, when Congress first attempted to impose an income tax, the notion of taxing a citizen's hard work was considered radical! Public outcry ensued; more importantly, the Supreme Court ruled the income tax unconstitutional. Only with passage of the 16th Amendment did Congress gain the ability to tax the productive endeavors of its citizens.

    Yet don't we need an income tax to fund the important functions of the federal government? You may be surprised to know that the income tax accounts for only approximately one-third of federal revenue. Only 10 years ago, the federal budget was roughly one-third less than it is today. Surely we could find ways to cut spending back to 1990 levels, especially when the Treasury has single year tax surpluses for the past several years. So perhaps the idea of an America without an income tax is not so radical after all.

    The harmful effects of the income tax are obvious. First and foremost, it has enabled government to expand far beyond its proper constitutional limits, regulating virtually every aspect of our lives. It has given government a claim on our lives and work, destroying our privacy in the process. It takes billions of dollars out of the legitimate private economy, with most Americans giving more than a third of everything they make to the federal government. This economic drain destroys jobs and penalizes productive behavior. The ridiculous complexity of the tax laws makes compliance a nightmare for both individuals and businesses. All things considered, our Founders would be dismayed by the income tax mess and the tragic loss of liberty which results.

    America without an income tax would be far more prosperous and far more free, but we must be prepared to fight to regain the liberty we have lost incrementally over the past century. I recently introduced "The Liberty Amendment," legislation which would repeal the 16th Amendment and effectively abolish the income tax. I truly believe that real tax reform, reform that so many frustrated Americans desperately want, requires bold legislation that challenges the Washington mind set. Congress talks about reform, but the current tax debate really involves nothing of substance. Both parties are content to continue tinkering with the edges of the tax code to please various special interests. The Liberty Amendment is an attempt to eliminate the system altogether, forcing Congress to find a simple and fair way to collect limited federal revenues. Most of all, the Liberty Amendment is an initiative aimed at reducing the size and scope of the federal government.

    Is it impossible to end the income tax? I don't believe so. In fact, I believe a serious groundswell movement of disaffected taxpayers is growing in this country. Millions of Americans are fed up with the current tax system, and they will bring pressure on Congress. Some sidestep Congress completely, bringing legal challenges questioning the validity of the tax code and the 16th Amendment itself. Ultimately, the Liberty Amendment could serve as a flashpoint for these millions of voices.
     
  15. FranchiseBlade

    FranchiseBlade Contributing Member
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    First of all Somalia does not have an Islamic theocracy as government, and you need to research some more before just talking about stuff.

    This is from our own state department website.
    http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2863.htm

    Your tax information is wrong on many levels. I'll start with the idea that lowering taxes doesn't increase the deficit.

    This talks about the increase in debt and deficit under Reagan due to lowering taxes.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reaganomics

    This talks about tax cuts increasing the deficit.
    http://voices.washingtonpost.com/ezra-klein/2010/09/yes_tax_cuts_increase_the_defi.html

    Here's something talking about tax cuts reducing the amount of revenues as percentage of GDP
    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2010/09/15/gop-plan-raise-debt-4-trillion/

    Furthermore everyone pays taxes. There are sales taxes, social security, etc. that are paid by everyone. That is true of anyone who has or spends money.
     
  16. rtsy

    rtsy Member

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    Rob Lewis / socialistworker.org approved.

    <iframe title="YouTube video player" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/8M3DLGP4UKQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
     
  17. bigtexxx

    bigtexxx Contributing Member

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    SamFisher -- did you consider the CELL PHONE ONLY VOTERS?

    OMG that's still hilarious to this day. Surely it will be enough to propel Kerry to victory. LMAO
     
  18. SamFisher

    SamFisher Contributing Member

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    X -1 > X.

    Always has, always will.

    Good god son, somebody queue the "no points - god have mercy on your soul" speech.

    Hang up your modem and get out of my intertubes before your stupid breaks it.
     
  19. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Contributing Member

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    If this is a "majority" then whoever voted Republicans in for 2010 clearly got the wrong memo.
     
  20. rhadamanthus

    rhadamanthus Contributing Member

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    No kidding. That was painful to read. It would be funny, but I assume our clueless friend Dennis can vote, so it's painful.
     

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