1. Welcome! Please take a few seconds to create your free account to post threads, make some friends, remove a few ads while surfing and much more. ClutchFans has been bringing fans together to talk Houston Sports since 1996. Join us!

Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai Are Awarded Nobel Peace Prize

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by AroundTheWorld, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. AroundTheWorld

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2000
    Messages:
    42,959
    Likes Received:
    9,766
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/11/w...-yousafzai-are-awarded-nobel-peace-prize.html

    Reaching across gulfs of age, gender, faith, nationality and even international celebrity, the Norwegian Nobel Committee on Friday awarded the 2014 peace prize to Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi of India, joining a teenage Pakistani known around the world with an Indian veteran of campaigns on behalf of children.

    At age 17, Ms. Yousafzai is the youngest recipient of the $1.1 million prize since it was created in 1901. Mr. Satyarthi is 60.

    The awards, announced in Oslo by Thorbjorn Jagland, the committee’s chairman, were in acknowledgment of their work in helping to promote universal schooling and in protecting children worldwide from abuse and exploitation, particularly young laborers in India on whose behalf Mr. Satyarthi has campaigned for decades.

    Pointedly, Mr. Jagland said, “The Nobel Committee regards it as an important point for a Hindu and a Muslim, an Indian and a Pakistani, to join in a common struggle for education and against extremism.”

    “Children must go to school and not be financially exploited,” Mr. Jagland said. "It is a prerequisite for peaceful global development that the rights of children and young people be respected. In conflict-ridden areas in particular, the violation of children leads to the continuation of violence from generation to generation.”

    “Showing great personal courage, Kailash Satyarthi, maintaining Gandhi’s tradition, has headed various forms of protests and demonstrations, all peaceful, focusing on the grave exploitation of children for financial gain,” Mr. Jagland said. “He has also contributed to the development of important international conventions on children’s rights.”

    Despite his works, Mr. Satyarthi is not nearly so widely known as Ms. Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban in 2012 for her campaigning on behalf of girls’ education in the Swat Valley of Pakistan. She was 15 at the time. Since then she has become a global emblem of her struggle, celebrated on television and publishing a memoir.

    She “has already fought for several years for the right of girls to education and has shown by example that children and young people, too, can contribute to improving their own situations,” Mr. Jagland said. “This she has done under the most dangerous circumstances. Through her heroic struggle, she has become a leading spokesperson for girls’ rights to education.”

    The prize came after a year in which war has spread into Europe with fighting in eastern Ukraine and across frontiers in the Middle East after the Sunni militant Islamic State pushed from Syria into Iraq in June.

    For the previous two years, the prize had been awarded to international bodies: the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons in 2013 and the European Union in 2012.

    The winner was chosen from 278 candidates, 47 of them of organizations, the highest overall number of candidates since the prize was first awarded in 1901. The previous record was 259 in 2013, according to the Oslo-based committee, which traditionally makes its final choice at the last minute and seeks unanimity.

    In the speculation that invariably precedes the announcement of the award, Ms. Yousafzai had been a favorite for two successive years. This year, some forecasters spoke of Pope Francis, and others said it was likely the committee would withhold the prize, as it last did during the Vietnam War in 1972 because the global horizon seemed so scarred by conflict.

    The nomination of Ms. Yousafzai, however, seemed in part to be intended as an inspirational message, offering a counterpoint to conflicts in Syria, Iraq, Yemen and elsewhere.

    Even as the prize was announced in the chanderliered splendor of the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, much global attention was focused on the bloody struggle for survival of the Kurdish town of Kobani on the Turkish-Syrian border against fighters from the Islamic State.

    Before Ms. Yousafzai, the youngest peace laureate had been Tawakkul Karman, a Yemeni peace campaigner who was 32 when she awarded the 2011 prize along with President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia and Leymah Gbowee, a Liberian campaigner for peace and women’s rights.

    Despite her international fame, Ms. Yousafzai has been seen as a more contentious and even divisive figure in her homeland. In the Swat Valley, which she left after being wounded in the shooting in October 2012 and evacuated in a military helicopter, there has been smoldering animosity toward her among Pakistanis who feared that the Islamists might one day return to the region.

    Ms. Yousafzai, who has said she wants to become her country’s prime minister one day, was treated for her head wounds in Britain after the Taliban attack on a bus in which she was traveling.

    Last year, she won several European awards and has published a memoir of her experiences, “I Am Malala.” The title echoed the circumstances of her shooting. When the Taliban gunman boarded her bus, he called out, “Who is Malala?” As she noted in an interview last year, her voice is now heard “in every corner of the world.”

    British news reports said Ms. Yousafzai was at school in Birmingham, England, where she has lived since being treated for the gunshot wounds, when the prize was announced and was taken out of her class to be informed of the award.

    For his part, Mr. Satyarthi, a former engineer, has long been associated with the struggle to free bonded laborers, some born into their condition and others lured into servitude.
     
  2. AroundTheWorld

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2000
    Messages:
    42,959
    Likes Received:
    9,766
    I hope she is safe in England. There are enough Islamist lunatics there as well.
     
  3. AroundTheWorld

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2000
    Messages:
    42,959
    Likes Received:
    9,766
    Radical Islam rearing its ugly head again.

    Taliban threatens Nobel laureate Malala

    A POWERFUL breakaway faction of the Pakistani Taliban threatened teenage education activist Malala Yousafzai with "sharp and shiny knives", hours after she was declared joint winner of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize.

    JAMAAT ul Ahrar, which in August separated from Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) also known as the Pakistani Taliban - posted its response to the win on Twitter late Saturday.

    "Characters like Malala should know that we are not deterred by propaganda of [non-believers]. We have prepared sharp and shiny knives for the enemy of Islam," tweeted spokesman Ehsanullah Ehsan.
    "Malala speaks so much against guns and armed conflicts. Does she not know that the founder of her recent Nobel award was the inventor of explosives," the spokesman said.
    Malala, a 17-year-old education activist, survived a gunshot wound to the head by a Taliban gunman in 2012.
    The mainstream TTP, an umbrella organisation of over a dozen groups, has not commented on Malala's accolade.
    Malala has received praise in Pakistan for becoming the youngest-ever Nobel Peace laureate, with all major newspapers running front page stories on her achievement.

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/new...-laureate-malala/story-fn3dxix6-1227087558257
     
  4. AroundTheWorld

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2000
    Messages:
    42,959
    Likes Received:
    9,766
    Palestinian human rights activist implores Malala: No money to Hamas, UNRWA

    Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai asked to prevent funds from reaching terror organization or UN body; 'Hamas acts according to the principles of radical Islam, not of the UN principles,' Bassem Eid writes in open-letter.

    [​IMG]

    Palestinian human rights activist Bassem Eid is asking Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai to keep her promise to share her award money with the children of the Gaza Strip but to prevent the funds from falling into the hands of Hamas. In an “Open Letter to Malala” Eid shared with The Media Line, the noted activist told the young Pakistani laureate that “Hamas acts according to the principles of radical Islam, not of the UN principles.”

    The text of the letter follows:

    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4602659,00.html
     
  5. Northside Storm

    Northside Storm Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2007
    Messages:
    11,262
    Likes Received:
    450
    well-deserved.

    ...why the hell is this in D&D? :confused:
     
  6. AroundTheWorld

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2000
    Messages:
    42,959
    Likes Received:
    9,766
    Because it's not a big ass Gordita?
     
  7. OlajuwonFan81

    OlajuwonFan81 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    2,671
    Likes Received:
    185
    Who cares where it is. I'm not sure why people are so quick to act like thread police.
     
  8. AroundTheWorld

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2000
    Messages:
    42,959
    Likes Received:
    9,766
    Malala Yousafzai is a Muslim I truly admire. Her courage is inspiring.
     
  9. Dairy Ashford

    Dairy Ashford Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2002
    Messages:
    14,165
    Likes Received:
    1,498
    I'm kind of hoping she spends it on an American immigration lawyer and an accounting degree at a state school in a large city.
     
  10. Dairy Ashford

    Dairy Ashford Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2002
    Messages:
    14,165
    Likes Received:
    1,498
    I guess it's open season on slack threads.
     
  11. VBG

    VBG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Messages:
    7,990
    Likes Received:
    307
    I just wish this was Malala Yousafzai is a person I truly admire. Her courage is inspiring.
     
  12. AroundTheWorld

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2000
    Messages:
    42,959
    Likes Received:
    9,766
    Yes, she is a person I truly admire. I was just pointing out that I admire her regardless of her religious beliefs, as I am often accused of being a Muslim hater or something. If all Muslims were like her, I wouldn't have a problem with Islam...
     
  13. g1184

    g1184 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Messages:
    1,798
    Likes Received:
    86
    ... but she follows a death cult ideology ...
     
  14. rimbaud

    rimbaud Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 1999
    Messages:
    8,056
    Likes Received:
    480
    This sentence infuriates me.
     

Share This Page

  • About ClutchFans

    Since 1996, ClutchFans has been loud and proud covering the Houston Rockets, helping set an industry standard for team fan sites. The forums have been a home for Houston sports fans as well as basketball fanatics around the globe.

  • Support ClutchFans!

    If you find that ClutchFans is a valuable resource for you, please consider becoming a Supporting Member. Supporting Members can upload photos and attachments directly to their posts, customize their user title and more. Gold Supporters see zero ads!


    Upgrade Now