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I Don't Know What to Call This Thread, But I Love this Article

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by MadMax, Sep 19, 2012.

  1. MadMax

    MadMax Contributing Member

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    I can not recall reading an article I resonated with more, personally, than this one.

    http://moralminoritybook.com/2012/0...of-what-when-did-i-sign-that-membership-card/

    Here’s another reason the evangelical left has failed to gain traction as an organized movement: discomfort with their label. Over at “Q,” Lisa Sharon Harper explains why her views don’t fit on the political continuum. She writes, “So, I reject the moniker “Christian Left.” It is a moniker drawn in hasty response to the “Religious Right” a political movement (not a theological one). I do not set the standards of my political engagement in response to some random political point on a line. No. Rather than anchoring my politics on the shifting sand of a linear continuum, I ask a higher question: “What is my axis?” What does my political engagement revolve around? Is it political ideology? Is it political party? Is it biblical theology? I choose the later.” You can read the rest of Harper’s interesting post here.

    This sentiment reflects a significant direction for evangelicals. Those who are leaving the religious right are often unwilling to join the evangelical left. Many, as I describe in an excerpt of Moral Minority,are headed for political independence:


    Such obstacles suggested that the bulk of evangelicals were likely headed for less partisan identification. The 15% drop in Republican identification resulted in a mere 5% rise in Democratic affiliation, but a 10% jump for independence. Political scientist John Green called these new evangelical non-rightists “freestyle evangelicals.” Michael Lindsay called them “cosmopolitan evangelicals.” . . . Bill Hybels, pastor of the megachurch Willow Creek outside of Chicago, told the New York Times that he considered politics a path to “heartache and disappointment.” He envisioned a less political (at least electorally), but no-less-socially engaged path that, according to the Times, “would warm a liberal’s heart.” “We have just pounded the drum again and again that, for churches to reach their full redemptive potential, they have to do more than hold services — they have to try to transform their communities,” Hybels said. “If there is racial injustice in your community, you have to speak to that. If there is educational injustice, you have to do something there. If the poor are being neglected by the government or being oppressed in some way, then you have to stand up for the poor.” Progressive social action outside of electoral structures stands as one of the principle legacies of the evangelical left. Its political relevance goes well beyond its marginal influence on the Democrats or Republicans. It has helped to launch engagement around a much broader array of issues—from African poverty to peacemaking to simple living—to which neither party pays much attention.
     
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  2. JeopardE

    JeopardE Contributing Member

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    This this this this this.

    I've always said that any Christian that blindly supports a political party and its platform has never read Joshua 5:13-14. I cringe when I see my Christian friends touting Republican talking points as if they were quoting the bible. Some of them have pretty much lost the distinction.
     
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  3. basso

    basso Contributing Member
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    i prefer to call them "earnest episcopals." ;)

    interesting article. i think another reason the exodus from the republican party hasn't resulted in much of a gain for the democrats, is the latter are some demonstrably antagonistic towards christianity. i would say "religion" but i think that's not really the case.
     
  4. A_3PO

    A_3PO Member

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    Truth. It soils the Gospel when it's associated with a list of Republican talking points. Some people I've tried to reach didn't give me much of a chance because they think joining a church and associating with Christians means becoming a Republican. It's tragic.
     
  5. Mathloom

    Mathloom Shameless Optimist
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    We need more of such people in the world. Sounds like these people are truly asking themselves WWJD.
     
  6. da_juice

    da_juice Member

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    I remember when I first started to really study politics, a lot of what I believed in at first was based on my Christian faith. I studied the Gospels and the words of Christ- and found that liberals tended to be more in touch with Jesus than most of the religious right was.
     

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