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glynch faints: Hugo Chavez's ambassador daughter is Venezuela's richest woman

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by AroundTheWorld, Aug 15, 2015.

  1. AroundTheWorld

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    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ela-s-richest-woman-according-new-report.html

    Being the ex-President's daughter pays off: Hugo Chavez's ambassador daughter is Venezuela's richest woman
    Diario las Americas claims that Maria Gabriela Chavez, 35, has $4.2billion in assets held in American and Andorran banks
    Hugo Chavez famously declared 'being rich is bad' and during his lifetime railed against the wealthy for being lazy and gluttonous
    Efforts to determine Chavez's wealth have been made before, without much luck


    The daughter of Hugo Chavez, the former president who once declared 'being rich is bad,' may be the wealthiest woman in Venezuela, according to evidence reportedly in the hands of Venezuelan media outlets.
    Maria Gabriela Chavez, 35, the late president's second-oldest daughter, holds assets in American and Andorran banks totaling almost $4.2billion, Diario las Americas reports.
    The figure would make Gabriela Chavez wealthier than media mogul Gustavo Cisneros, whom Forbes named the wealthiest Venezuelan earlier this year with $3.6billion in assets.

    The Miami-based newspaper did not detail what evidence there was outlining Chavez's assets, though there have long been rumors she held a sizable fortune.
    Last year, reporter María Elvira Salazar displayed what appeared to be a receipt showing millions in a bank account belonging to Gabriela Chavez withdrawn in the United States.
    The receipt displayed the name Frabz Federal Bank, a fictitious bank used in a meme of fake ATM receipts.

    Others close to Chavez managed to build up great personal wealth that was kept outside the petrostate.
    Alejandro Andrade, who served as Venezuela’s treasury minister from 2007 to 2010 and was reportedly a close associate of Chavez, was discovered to have $11.2billion in his name sitting in HSBC accounts in Switzerland, according to documents leaked by whistleblower Hervé Falciani.

    During his lifetime, Hugo Chavez denounced wealthy individuals, once railing against the rich for being 'lazy.'
    'The rich don't work, they're lazy,' he railed in a speech in 2010. 'Every day they go drinking whiskey - almost every day - and drugs, cocaine, they travel.'
    After her father's death in 2013 and until her appointment to the United Nations as alternate ambassador, Chavez continued to live in the presidential mansion, forcing the current president Nicolas Maduro to remain at the vice presidential home.
    El Comercio reported in 2014 that opposition congressman Carlos Berrisbeitía claimed the daughters of Chavez and Maduro, were costing the Venezuelan state $3.6million a day
     
  2. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Contributing Member

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    Am disappoint without pic but meh...

    [​IMG]

    Four legs good, two legs better.
     
  3. Mr. Clutch

    Mr. Clutch Contributing Member

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    Criminal scum
     
  4. Haymitch

    Haymitch Custom Title
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    Maybe she earned all that money investing in an environmentally friendly co-op?
     
  5. Liberon

    Liberon Rookie

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    I could hit it if she was fond of me and could share some of that $4.2 billion. She was caught traumatized and off guard. I could work with that but I can see how some people couldn't.
     
  6. glynch

    glynch Contributing Member

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    I will be very disgusted if true. There is a real disnformation war against Venezuela so only the gullible will believe all sources out of Miami and the Venezuelan exile community.
     
  7. Remii

    Remii Member

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    Late night full of that good and my booty call chicks are with their husbands and or boyfriends ---> she'll do... I wouldn't run around bragging about it though.
     
  8. Buck Turgidson

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    We have all know about this for some time, yall shouldn't pile on glynch just because he's 40 years or so behind the curve.
     
  9. Dairy Ashford

    Dairy Ashford Member

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    Whether through outright appropriation or just the government equivalent of insider trading with regards to advance information about mineral rights, land development or contracting awards, this happens pretty much everywhere. We had a railroad commissioner found half of Exxon and an MLB franchise owner renting a stadium built and leased by the county and city he was running a few years earlier.

    That's not even counting the power of their rolodexes, look at how many former congressmen and Senators become investment bankers with probably not a lick of financial or business experience. Unfortunately the cost of retaining and attracting degreed, experienced accountants and lawyers to investigate and curtail this stuff round-the-clock is probably prohibitive from some countries' tax and treasury standpoints.
     
  10. Nook

    Nook Member

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    Misinformation? Like having the highest murder rate in the world in their major cities, even though they purposely under report murders?

    No Venezuela is an absolute hole. Chavez took over a bad situation and made it far worse. People with no knowledge or education were put in positions of power (much like Idi Amin). Over time the Chavez administration became more and more corrupt.

    Chavez was a scumbag. When push came to shove he was no better than other dictators like Rawlings and others.
     
  11. AroundTheWorld

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    Putin is incredibly rich as well...so is Erdogan.
     
  12. Nook

    Nook Member

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    Yes and they are self serving scumbags as well. They leverage their power and play factions and boogiemen against one another and attempt to keep their people distracted.

    It doesn't matter if they claim allegiance to the left or right.
     
  13. Liberon

    Liberon Rookie

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    Honestly she isn't that bad.....
     
  14. glynch

    glynch Contributing Member

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    You do have this on good word from the folks in Miami and the ex oil folks in Houston that conspired with their corrupt elite and the US government to cripple their own elected government but lost the strike against the oil industry when the ordinary workers replaced them and ran the refineries.

    Your sources sort of reminds me of when you all fell for the cooked intelligence of Cheny's and Bush's phony Iraqi exiles about wmd.

    Yeah, it is so much worse for the lower 50% who can now read and have basic healthcare and clean drinking water.
     
  15. glynch

    glynch Contributing Member

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    For those who might want a bit of balance and info of what it was like for the majority of Venezuelans before Chavez. and expand their horizons beyond the mainstream media and at times just down right deliberate misinformation.

    Excerpts from the book Cowboy in Caracas which I have read.

    *************

    I met Charlie Hardy, a former Mary Knoll priest (from
    Wyoming) and a missionary, in Caracas, Venezuela when I was there as an international accompanier of the Venezuelan elections in April. ...


    On the the way to our destination, Charlie explained, as he does very well in his book, that he lived for eight years as a Maryknoll missionary in cardboard hut in Terrace B of the barrio Nueva Tacagua, beginning in 1985. As Charlie explained to us, and as he explains in his book, Cowboy in Caracas, his first introduction to barrio life was stepping into “a mountain of fecal matter.”

    As Charlie relates in his book, “I don’t think there was a square inch of Terrace B that had not been tainted by human or animal excrement at some time. The problem was threefold: lack of running water, lack of toilets, and lack of enclosed sewers. In front of my door, a stream of black water carried the sewage from my neighbors’ dwelling to the miniature black river behind my house. Soon I would cease to notice the stench. That day I did.”

    ... As Charlie explains in his book, “[w]ater arrived on Terrace B in tank trucks with the words ‘DRINKING WATER’ painted on their sides. They were old and dirty and the hoses that carried the water to our barrels were equally disgusting. The price was much, much higher than what the wealthy in other parts of town paid for the same quantity, which they received through their faucets. . . . We never knew when the trucks would return. Sometimes more than a month passed without water.”

    Charlie explains how the grinding poverty in the barrios, combined with the rising price of basic foodstuffs and gasoline – which resulted in the jump in the cost of transportation – led to the spontaneous barrio uprisings, known as the Caracazo, shortly after President Carlos Andres Perez assumed office in February of 1989. As Charlie writes, during this uprising, which was marked by looting, the police “became assassins, firing indiscriminately into crowds running away from them. . . . The situation became worse when the president ordered the army into the streets.”

    http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/06/21/a-cowboy-in-caracas/
     
  16. glynch

    glynch Contributing Member

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    delete
     
    #16 glynch, Aug 16, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2015
  17. AroundTheWorld

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    I was in Venezuela and spoke with regular people. No cooked intelligence.

    Only in your fantasy world.

    Let me ask you: Do you think it is a normal democratic process that the daughter of a late dictator gets appointed to an ambassador post?
     
  18. subtomic

    subtomic Contributing Member
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    Is this even a serious question? In every country, ambassadors are often appointed based on their connections (including family). I know that isn't the larger problem here, so why are you even making a big deal about this?

    Venezuela's problem is not socialism or Chavez, but a culture of corruption that makes leaders of any ilk feel entitled to milk the state of its asserts. Chavez maintained his power by appealing to those who had nothing under the previous regime. Their lives were barely improved under Chavez, but anything is better than nothing and as self-interest trumps collective-interest in most humans, they were willing to support him even as he seized more power and ran the country as whole into the ground.

    This should be a lesson to our country - we leave ourselves vulnerable to charlatans like Chavez when we allow gross inequity to fester.
     
  19. Steve_Francis_rules

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    She probably made that money in cattle futures after reading a WSJ article.
     
  20. Dubious

    Dubious Contributing Member

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    Unvetted misinformation looks the same as information. I'd guess the only things worth 4.2 billion in Venezuela would be things like the entire oil industry, the entire communications industry or the entire entertainment industry. Seems like you'd have to own those somehow within a socialist state. So, it doesn't seem likely.
     

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