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Free throws - if your good during practice and bad during games maybe this is why

Discussion in 'Houston Rockets: Game Action & Roster Moves' started by ComeBack, Dec 23, 2013.

  1. ComeBack

    ComeBack Member

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    I was watching NBA games and during the free throws I realized the hand slapping after an attempt seemed a little strange to me so I went digging on the internet and found an article.

    http://lexnihilnovi.blogspot.com/2008/02/free-throw-hand-slap-who-started-it.html

    " The Free Throw Hand Slap: Who Started It?
    Jim Barnett can't stand it. The Warriors' television color commentator, and a career 79.7 percent free-throw shooter during his 11-year NBA career, said he has no idea how it started. But he has strong opinions about the person who began the widespread practice of tapping hands after free throws.

    It happens after every first free throw -- a player leaves his spot on the line and slaps hands with a teammate. If the free throw was made, it's a congratulatory gesture. If the free throw was missed, it becomes a form of encouragement. A couple of seasons ago, Dallas Mavericks guard Jason Terry reworked his free-throw stroke. He told reporters that thorough evaluation of his stroke revealed he was including the handshake in his follow-through.

    "Whoever started that," Barnett joked, "should face the firing squad.

    "That doesn't happen in practice," Barnett continued. "In practice, you stay at the line and you make two in a row, five in a row, 10 in a row. You don't do all that hand-shaking business in practice. Why would you do it in the games?"

    Shooting experts are unanimous about routine and repetition being an essential part of successful free-throw shooting. Warriors assistant coach Sydney Moncrief, who was brought on initially as a shooting coach, has been stressing to the Warriors to bring what they do in practice to the free-throw line in games.

    The goal is to come almost robotic at the line, to knock down free throws out of habit and negate other factors such as pressure and fatigue.

    The word obviously is out, as some have taken the routine to a new level. Washington Wizards guard Gilbert Arenas has a famous pre-free-throw routine: He whips the ball around his body three times, spins it in his hands once and follows with two dribbles.

    Some routines are exaggerations of tips, such as Dallas swingman Jerry Stackhouse's full-on squat at the line and Chicago guard Ben Gordon's follow-through rehearsal. Some border on showmanship, such as Houston guard Steve Francis rubbing a tattoo or New Jersey Nets guard Jason Kidd saying hello to his kids by rubbing the side of his face before blowing a kiss to his wife. "

    The article gave me a thought.

    Do you think the hand slapping could throw off a player's rhythm during shot attempt when they shoot their free throws one after another during practice. After you take a shot you slap hands with the person to your right, left, then the 2 behind you. Would incorporating these moves in practice help? I can see how these movements can throw off a persons shooting motion when free throws is all about repetition.

    What does everyone else think?
     
  2. Nick

    Nick Contributing Member

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    You also don't shoot the practice free throws after running up and down the court, fighting for position, and getting hacked/slapped hard.

    There probably is some validity to it.... but there are countless other acts during the game that differ from practice... doesn't mean that practice doesn't translate to game situations.

    Players seem to always hit open shots in warmups/practice... not so much during the game. And when they do hit open shots during the game, they usually do something that they'd never do in practice/warmups (a head nod to the passer, a high-five, trash-talk, etc.).
     
  3. SugarLandDream8

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    Some people are good singing in their shower alone but freeze up if they have to sign in front of a crowd especially a large one.

    A lot more pressure shooting FTs when it matters and hearing boos on the road
     
  4. EnergyGuy

    EnergyGuy Rookie

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    If you stick to a routine before you shoot the FTs, it shouldn't matter whether there is or is not a hand slap in between.

    90% FT shooters also hand slap
     
  5. fchowd0311

    fchowd0311 Contributing Member

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    He uses his arms only when he shoots. He needs to use his legs also.
     
  6. RV6

    RV6 Contributing Member

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    I think we already knew he was getting in a rhythm in practice and that's why he was so much better. There's a lot that he does differently, so it's not just the hand slapping. He needs to be able to make them regardless though, otherwise it's a fluke.
     
  7. Xsatyr

    Xsatyr Member

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    In practice you are shooting numerous free throws in a roll which allows you to get in rhythm. Not too mention you're shooting them without any pressure nor his your adrenaline pumping.
     
  8. ComeBack

    ComeBack Member

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    Free throws are as close to practice shots as you can get and I'm not saying practice doesn't translate into game situations. What I'm saying if every player steps up and back to hand slap after a shot maybe it would help them to incorporate that into their practice sessions. During the pre game a lot of player shoot their free throws one after another.
     
  9. topfive

    topfive CF OG

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    I think the hand-slapping is idiotic, too, but I doubt it has any effect on Dwight's shots.
     
  10. StupidMoniker

    StupidMoniker I lost a bet
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    Get rid of the hand slapping. Don't do it because of some negative effect, do it because it is a stupid and pointless waste of time.
     
  11. Carl Herrera

    Carl Herrera Contributing Member

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    Dwight needs to get hand slaps in practice to simulate game conditions.
     
  12. Panda23

    Panda23 Member

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    god even I can shoot 80% in practice.

    When you're running up and down a court, fatigued, hacked, its harder to get in a rythm.
     
  13. Pat

    Pat Contributing Member
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    John Lucas was the first person I saw with the hand slap.
     
  14. WinkFan

    WinkFan Contributing Member

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    Almost everyone is good during practice. Almost every player shoots worse in games than in practice.
     
  15. sealclubber1016

    Supporting Member

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    I've never understood why people compare practice, where you shoot dozens of FT's consecutively to game action where you shoot two, and then 20 minutes later go back for another 2. In practice you can stand there and get into a rhythm.

    Remember the Denver game where the Nuggets sent dwight to the line on line 9 straight possesions. After a while not only was he making them, he wasn't even touching iron.
     
  16. Easy

    Easy Boban Only Fan
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    Yes, but if you shoots over 80% in practice and under 60% in game, something's not right.
     
  17. Xsatyr

    Xsatyr Member

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    In practice you are shooting them consecutively as opposed to in game where you are shooting a couple at a time. It's harder to get in rhythm.
     
  18. CertifiedTroll

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    With Dwight his mechanics are so poor and his shot is so flat and hard that there is no room for error. Since he isnt as loose in games as practice his timing is slightly thrown off resulting in alot more misses.
     

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