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For they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind.

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by basso, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. basso

    basso Contributing Member
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    i'm not a trump supporter, and wasn't really a tea partier, although i understood why they came about.
    but i've written here many times about the condescension towards, and outright lies told about them many times. Glenn (Instapundit) focuses on David Brooks here, but it could apply to most of the left, and Obama's enablers.

    for every time you called a tea partier a racist, another trump supporter was born.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/opini...arty-bourgeois-working-class-column/82047484/

    [rquoter]Political establishment denounced bourgeois Tea Party. Now, they must face raucous working-class Trumpsters.

    Last week, in assessing the rise of Donald Trump, New York Times columnist David Brooks engaged in an uncharacteristic bit of self-reflection:

    “Trump voters,” he wrote, “are a coalition of the dispossessed. They have suffered lost jobs, lost wages, lost dreams. The American system is not working for them, so naturally they are looking for something else. Moreover, many in the media, especially me, did not understand how they would express their alienation. We expected Trump to fizzle because we were not socially intermingled with his supporters and did not listen carefully enough. For me, it’s a lesson that I have to change the way I do my job if I’m going to report accurately on this country.” (Emphasis added.)

    Well, it’s a lesson for a lot of people in the punditocracy, of whom Brooks — who famously endorsed Barack Obama after viewing his sharply creased pants — is just one. And if Brooks et al. had paid attention, the roots of the Trump phenomenon wouldn’t have been so difficult to fathom.

    Brooks is, of course, horrified at Trump and his supporters, whom he finds childish, thuggish and contemptuous of the things that David Brooks likes about today’s America. It’s clear that he’d like a social/political revolution that was more refined, better-mannered, more focused on the Constitution and, well, more bourgeois as opposed to in-your-face and working class.

    The thing is, we had that movement. It was the Tea Party movement. Unlike Brooks, I actually ventured out to “intermingle” with Tea Partiers at various events that I covered for PJTV.com, contributing commentary to the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Examiner. As I reported from one event in Nashville, “Pundits claim the tea partiers are angry — and they are — but the most striking thing about the atmosphere in Nashville was how cheerful everyone seemed to be. I spoke with dozens of people, and the responses were surprisingly similar. Hardly any had ever been involved in politics before. Having gotten started, they were finding it to be not just worthwhile, but actually fun. Laughter rang out frequently, and when new-media mogul Andrew Breitbart held forth on a TV interview, a crowd gathered and broke into spontaneous applause. A year ago, many told me, they were depressed about the future of America. Watching television pundits talk about President Obama's transformative plans for big government, they felt alone, isolated and helpless. That changed when protests, organized by bloggers, met Mr. Obama a year ago in Denver, Colo., Mesa, Ariz., and Seattle, Wash. Then came CNBC talker Rick Santelli's famous on-air rant on Feb. 19, 2009, which gave the tea-party movement its name. Tea partiers are still angry at federal deficits, at Washington's habit of rewarding failure with handouts and punishing success with taxes and regulation, and the general incompetence that has marked the first year of the Obama presidency. But they're no longer depressed.”


    USA TODAY
    Carly Fiorina: Ted Cruz can stop Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

    One of the most famous things about the Tea Partiers was that — as befits a relentlessly bourgeois protest movement — they left things cleaner than they found them. Rich Lowry reported from Washington, DC: “Just as stunning as the tableaux of the massive throngs lining the reflecting pool were the images of the spotless grounds afterward. If someone had told attendees they were expected to mow the grass before they left, surely some of them would have hitched flatbed trailers to their vehicles for the trip to Washington and gladly brought mowers along with them. This was the revolt of the bourgeois, of the responsible, of the orderly, of people profoundly at peace with the traditional mores of American society. The spark that lit the tea-party movement was the rant by CNBC commentator Rick Santelli, who inveighed in early 2009 against an Obama-administration program to subsidize ‘the losers’ mortgages.’ He was speaking for people who hadn’t borrowed beyond their means or tried to get rich quick by flipping houses, for the people who, in their thrift and enterprise, ‘carry the water instead of drink the water.’ The tea party’s detractors want to paint it as radical, when at bottom it represents the self-reliant, industrious heart of American life.”

    In San Francisco, too, tea party protesters met pro-Obama activists and picked up their trash. "John," author of The City Square blog wrote: “As Obama supporters moved along in the line to get into the fundraiser, they left behind an impressive amount of trash ... Tea Partiers shouted ‘pick up your garbage’ and ‘this is San Francisco, what about recycling?’ There was no response. They chanted ‘Obama leaves a mess.’ Still no response. Eventually, a tea partier (wearing the black cowboy hat) crosses over and starts to pick up the trash on his own. Other tea partiers join him. Another manages to find a trash bag. Soon the trash is being collected.”


    USA TODAY
    Trump wants to lock out people like me: Column

    POLICING THE USA: A look at race, justice, media

    Yet the tea party movement was smeared as racist, denounced as fascist, harassed with impunity by the IRS and generally treated with contempt by the political establishment — and by pundits like Brooks, who declared "I'm not a fan of this movement." After handing the GOP big legislative victories in 2010 and 2014, it was largely betrayed by the Republicans in Congress, who broke their promises to shrink government and block Obama’s initiatives.

    So now we have Trump instead, who tells people to punch counterprotesters instead of picking up their trash.

    When politeness and orderliness are met with contempt and betrayal, do not be surprised if the response is something less polite, and less orderly. Brooks closes his Trump column with Psalm 73, but a more appropriate verse is Hosea 8:7 "For they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind.” Trump’s ascendance is a symptom of a colossal failure among America’s political leaders, of which Brooks’ mean-spirited insularity is only a tiny part. God help us all.[/rquoter]
     
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  2. Sweet Lou 4 2

    Sweet Lou 4 2 Contributing Member
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    This is a nice rewriting of history Basso.

    How about we move away from historical fiction?
     
  3. pirc1

    pirc1 Contributing Member

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    tea party is the worst thing to happen to the US politics in the last thirty years.
     
  4. Major

    Major Member

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  5. JayGoogle

    JayGoogle Member

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    So then...what should we call these people?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Just wondering.
     
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  6. Sweet Lou 4 2

    Sweet Lou 4 2 Contributing Member
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    The tea party was started by the likes of the koch brothers to oppose Obama, they unleashed something they could not control. They only have themselves to thank for stocking such dark fires. Play with fire , get burned by it.

    Good job conservatives.
     
  7. Sweet Lou 4 2

    Sweet Lou 4 2 Contributing Member
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    The real manufacturing of the tea party (goes way back before Obama:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_Party_movement

    Background

    References to the Boston Tea Party were part of Tax Day protests held in the 1990s and before.[17][18][19][20] In 1984, David H. Koch and Charles G. Koch of Koch Industries founded Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE), a conservative political group whose self-described mission was "to fight for less government, lower taxes, and less regulation." Congressman Ron Paul was appointed as the first chairman of the organization. The CSE lobbied for policies favorable to corporations, particularly tobacco companies.[citation needed]
    In 2002, a Tea Party movement website was designed and published by the CSE at web address www.usteaparty.com, and stated "our US Tea Party is a national event, hosted continuously online and open to all Americans who feel our taxes are too high and the tax code is too complicated."[74][75] The site did not take off at the time.[76] In 2003, Dick Armey became the chairman of CSE after retiring from Congress.[77] In 2004, Citizens for a Sound Economy split into FreedomWorks, for 501c4 advocacy activity, and the Americans for Prosperity Foundation. Dick Armey stayed as chairman of FreedomWorks, while David Koch stayed as Chairman of the Americans for Prosperity Foundation. The two organizations would become key players in the Tea Party movement from 2009 onward.[78][79] Americans for Prosperity and FreedomWorks were "probably the leading partners" in the September 2009 Taxpayer March on Washington, also known as the "9/12 Tea Party," according to The Guardian.[80]
    Commentaries on origin
    Fox News Channel commentator Juan Williams has said that the Tea Party movement emerged from the "ashes" of Ron Paul's 2008 presidential primary campaign.[81] Indeed, Ron Paul has stated that its origin was, on December 16, 2007, when supporters held a 24-hour record breaking, "moneybomb" fundraising event on the Boston Tea Party's 234th anniversary,[82] but that others, including Republicans, took over and changed some of the movement's core beliefs.[83][84] Writing for Slate.com, Dave Weigel has argued in concurrence that, in his view, the "first modern Tea Party events occurred in December 2007, long before Barack Obama took office, and they were organized by supporters of Rep. Ron Paul," with the movement expanding and gaining prominence in 2009.[65] Barack Obama, the first African American President of the United States, took office in January 2009. Journalist Joshua Green has stated in The Atlantic that while Ron Paul is not the Tea Party's founder, or its culturally resonant figure, he has become the "intellectual godfather" of the movement since many now agree with his long-held beliefs.[85]
    Journalist Jane Mayer has said that the Koch brothers were essential in funding and strengthening the movement, through groups such as Americans for Prosperity.[79] In 2013, a study published in the journal Tobacco Control concluded that organizations within the movement were connected with non-profit organizations that the tobacco industry and other corporate interests worked with and provided funding for,[74][86] including the group Citizens for a Sound Economy.[87][88] Al Gore cited the study and said that the connections between "market fundamentalists", the tobacco industry and the Tea Party could be traced to a 1971 memo from tobacco lawyer Lewis F. Powell, Jr. who advocated more political power for corporations. Gore said that the Tea Party is an extension of this political strategy "to promote corporate profit at the expense of the public good."[89]
    Former governor of Alaska and vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin, keynoting a Tea Party Tax Day protest at the state capital in Madison, Wisconsin on April 15, 2011, reflected on the origins of the Tea Party movement and credited President Barack Obama, saying "And speaking of President Obama, I think we ought to pay tribute to him today at this Tax Day Tea Party because really he’s the inspiration for why we’re here today. That’s right. The Tea Party Movement wouldn’t exist without Barack Obama."[90][91]
    Early local protest events
    On January 24, 2009, Trevor Leach, chairman of the Young Americans for Liberty in New York State organized a "Tea Party" to protest obesity taxes proposed by New York Governor David Paterson and call for fiscal responsibility on the part of the government. Several of the protesters wore Native American headdresses similar to the band of 18th century colonists who dumped tea in Boston Harbor to express outrage about British taxes.[92]
    Some of the protests were partially in response to several federal laws: the Bush administration's Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008,[93] and the Obama administration's economic stimulus package the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009[94][95] and healthcare reform legislation.[96] The bailouts of banks by the Bush and Obama administrations triggered the Tea Party's rise, according to political analyst Scott Rasmussen. Tea party participants "think federal spending, deficits and taxes are too high, and they think no one in Washington is listening to them, and that latter point is really, really important," Rasmussen said.[97]
    New York Times journalist Kate Zernike reported that leaders within the Tea Party credit Seattle blogger and conservative activist Keli Carender with organizing the first Tea Party in February 2009, although the term "Tea Party" was not used.[98] Other articles, written by Chris Good of The Atlantic[99] and NPR's Martin Kaste,[100] credit Carender as "one of the first" Tea Party organizers and state that she "organized some of the earliest Tea Party-style protests".
    Carender first organized what she called a "Porkulus Protest" in Seattle on Presidents Day, February 16, the day before President Barack Obama signed the stimulus bill into law.[101] Carender said she did it without support from outside groups or city officials. "I just got fed up and planned it." Carender said 120 people participated. "Which is amazing for the bluest of blue cities I live in, and on only four days notice! This was due to me spending the entire four days calling and emailing every person, think tank, policy center, university professors (that were sympathetic), etc. in town, and not stopping until the day came."[98][102]
    Contacted by Carender, Steve Beren promoted the event on his blog four days before the protest[103] and agreed to be a speaker at the rally.[104] Carender also contacted conservative author and Fox News Channel contributor Michelle Malkin, and asked her to publicize the rally on her blog, which Malkin did the day before the event.[105] The following day, the Colorado branch of Americans for Prosperity held a protest at the Colorado Capitol, also promoted by Malkin.[106] Carender held a second protest on February 27, 2009, reporting "We more than doubled our attendance at this one."[98]
    First national protests
    On February 18, 2009, the one-month old Obama administration announced the Homeowners Affordability and Stability Plan, an economic recovery plan to help home owners avoid foreclosure by refinance mortgages in the wake of the Great Recession. The next day, CNBC business news editor Rick Santelli criticized the Plan in a live broadcast from the floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. He said that those plans were "promoting bad behavior" by "subsidizing losers' mortgages". He suggested holding a tea party for traders to gather and dump the derivatives in the Chicago River on July 1. “President Obama, are you listening?” he asked.[107][108][109][110][111] A number of the floor traders around him cheered on his proposal, to the amusement of the hosts in the studio. Santelli's "rant" became a viral video after being featured on the Drudge Report.[112]
    According to The New Yorker writer Ben McGrath and New York Times reporter Kate Zernike, this is where the movement was first inspired to coalesce under the collective banner of "Tea Party."[98][107] Santelli's remarks "set the fuse to the modern anti-Obama Tea Party movement," according to journalist Lee Fang.[113] About 10 hours after Santelli's remarks, reTeaParty.com was bought to coordinate Tea Parties scheduled for Independence Day and, as of March 4, was reported to be receiving 11,000 visitors a day.[114] Within hours, the conservative political advocacy group Americans for Prosperity registered the domain name "TaxDayTeaParty.com," and launched a website calling for protests against Obama.[113] Overnight, websites such as "ChicagoTeaParty.com" (registered in August 2008 by Chicagoan Zack Christenson, radio producer for conservative talk show host Milt Rosenberg) were live within 12 hours.[114] By the next day, guests on Fox News had already begun to mention this new "Tea Party."[115] As reported by The Huffington Post, a Facebook page was developed on February 20 calling for Tea Party protests across the country.[116]
    A "Nationwide Chicago Tea Party" protest was coordinated across over 40 different cities for February 27, 2009, thus establishing the first national modern Tea Party protest.[117][118] The movement has been supported nationally by at least 12 prominent individuals and their associated organizations.[119] Fox News called many of the protests in 2009 "FNC Tax Day Tea Parties" which it promoted on air and sent speakers to.[120][121] This was to include then-host Glenn Beck, though Fox came to discourage him from attending later events.[122]
     
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  8. larsv8

    larsv8 Contributing Member

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    The Tea Party are a bunch of low educated, low income, racists, who are suffering for whatever reason and do what stupid people do best, they look for someone to blame.

    Enter the Fauxnews propaganda machine, who are desperate to hide the real culprits of most of this countries issues, which constantly churns their narrative of "hey we aren't racist (its dead, don't ya know) but the black man in the white house, the mexican people who came across the border, and the low income, mostly black, taker class, are the root of all your problems!"

    Unsurprisingly, the result is the emergence of a bigoted reality star, who appeals to this inbred army of low information voters, who does not nothing but churn out zingers and target the scapegoats.

    It was an inevitable conclusion, but shockingly the establishment Republicans, and their media shills still can't seem to accept they are the cause of this monster and change their ways.

    What I can't figure out is if they know everything they are saying is total horse****, or it has gotten to the point where they actually believe the nonsense they are spouting out non stop. I am sad to say that I don't think this is going to get any better and no positive changes can happen without a catastrophic type trigger event which spurs radical changes in thinking.
     
  9. B-Bob

    B-Bob my celli weighs a ton
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    Nothing like decrying ignorant self-righteousness with an ignorant, self-righteous screed.

    What a piece of complete trash that column is. LOL. I love that he can't even allow Brooks to choose his own scripture. Oh no, David's not worthy.

    And what an easy piñata David Brooks makes for wingers and leftists alike. Anyone who might display an ounce of humility, uncertainty, or regret will get blasted in today's America. WHERE IS PRESIDENT CAMACHO?! IT IS TIME!!
     
  10. Codman

    Codman Contributing Member

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    Decent read, but familiar.... The Tea Party was a hype that never reached strong relevancy. A fair parallel could be Anthony Bennett as the #1 pick, ultimately being a bust. :)

    I just don't see what, if anything, related to the TP can be genuinely defended. The Tea Party came out like an explosion with some appeal to the fringes, but everything went cold rather quickly because there was not enough calculated,enduring thinking.

    With any group that starts to make "noise," you're going to find some embellishment from the media and what not. However, the entire TP movement reeked of disorganization and, in many instances, chaos from the ideological confusion among its own members. And, of course, the confusion led to division and what some would call extinction.
     
  11. Cohete Rojo

    Cohete Rojo Contributing Member

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    They sound like horrible people.
     
  12. Nolen

    Nolen Contributing Member

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    The game is on for conservatives to form a narrative to somehow blame the current freak show that is the Republican nomination race on the democrats.

    Good luck with that.

    "It's Obamas fault because he's so divisive!" Grow up.
    "It's the liberals' fault because they called the Tea Party racist!" Eyeroll.

    Look, it's a good thing you conservatives are embarrassed by the republican party. It is. It shows you have some common sense and decency. Now embrace your conservative values of accountability and hold the people on your side accountable for their own stupid bull****. "It's the Left's fault that the republican party will nominate Donald Drumpf as the nominee for President of the United States! Waaahhhh!"

    Grow up.
     
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  13. rage

    rage Member

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    Rep: Trump is Obama's fault.
    Dem: I thought you don't like Obama?
    Rep: No, I don't , that's why I blame Trump on Obama.
    Dem: Hmm, maybe I am missing something ... don't you think Trump is good for America? Don't you want to vote for him?
    Rep: ;( :(
     
  14. basso

    basso Contributing Member
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    ahem.
     
  15. RedRedemption

    RedRedemption Contributing Member

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    Alt-right, SJWs.
    The moderates are the largest force in US politics and we were left choosing between slimy and yucky.
    Both parties need to stop getting hijacked by fringe groups.
     
  16. JayGoogle

    JayGoogle Member

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    Wait...what do we call these people then? I guess white fragility is a real thing, don't call a racist a racist.

     
  17. Anticope

    Anticope Member

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    It's cute that the poster who spent years spamming this board with partisan BS only to run away from any actual discussion is lecturing others on divisiveness.
     
  18. Dei

    Dei Member

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    You've got your head stuck so far up your ass it's pathetic.
     
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  19. basso

    basso Contributing Member
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    1 in 3 latinos voted for Trump.
     
  20. JayGoogle

    JayGoogle Member

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    doesn't answer my question. What do you call those people basso?
     

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