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Egypt in crisis over attack on Israeli embassy in Cairo

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by AroundTheWorld, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. AroundTheWorld

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    An Egyptian cabinet member says the country is in a deep crisis and those who ransacked the Israeli embassy in Cairo have hurt Egypt's image abroad.
    Egypt is on alert after protesters stormed the Israeli embassy on Friday, prompting the evacuation of nearly all diplomatic personnel there.
    Three people were killed when security forces moved in to deal with rioting.
    State media say at least 448 people were injured in the clashes on Friday night and Saturday.
    Information minister Osama Haikal says those responsible will be tried in emergency state security courts.

    [​IMG]
    Demonstrators outside the Israeli embassy building in Cairo early on Saturday.
    PHOTO: AFP


    The BBC reports six members of the embassy staff were trapped inside the building during the riot and had to be rescued by Egyptian commandos.
    The Israeli consul remains in Cairo as acting ambassador.
    Daily protests have been held at the embassy since the killing of five Egyptian border guards in Sinai on 18 August.
    Anti-Israeli feeling rose after an incident on the Gaza border last month.
    Five Egyptian policemen were killed on 18 August when Israeli forces pursued Palestinians who had killed eight Israelis.
    An Israeli official told the BBC that the intruders had entered consular offices, but not the main embassy.
    After initially standing by, police moved against the protesters, firing tear gas. Several vehicles were set alight.
    A BBC correspondent says the clashes at the embassy have shocked people both in Egypt and abroad.
    Reports on State TV said Prime Minister Essam Sharaf had offered to step down but his resignation was refused by Field Marshal Tantawi, the country's military leader.
    Under former President Hosni Mubarak, such violent displays of anger against Israel would not have been tolerated
    The unrest began after Friday prayers, when thousands converged on Tahrir Square to demand faster political reforms following the ousting of Mr Mubarak in February.
    Correspondents say tensions between Israel and Egypt have risen since President Mubarak was forced from office on 11 February.
    Treaty implications
    A treaty between Egypt and Israel was signed on 26 March 1979 by President Anwar Sadat and Prime Minister Menachem Begin at the White House and witnessed by President Jimmy Carter.
    In a televised address in Jerusalem, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel will stick to the peace treaty with Egypt despite the attack.
    ''Israel will continue to hold fast to the peace accord with Egypt,'' Mr Netanyahu.
    ''We are working together with the Egyptian government to return our ambassador to Cairo soon.
    ''I would like to ensure that the security arrangements necessary for him and for our staff will be steadfast.
    Mr Netanyahu also thanked President Barack Obama for American help to evacuate the embassy.
    ''He (Mr Obama) said, 'I will do all that I can.' He did that. He applied all of the means and influence of the United States of America, which are certainly substantial.''

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/world/84840/egypt-in-crisis-over-attack-on-israeli-embassy-in-cairo

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    Why do riots start so often "after the Friday prayers"? Seems like the same thing keeps happening in many countries. Coincidence? Religion has nothing to do with it?
     
    #1 AroundTheWorld, Sep 11, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2011
  2. durvasa

    durvasa Contributing Member

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    You forgot the link.
     
  3. AroundTheWorld

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    Arab Spring myth exposed
    Op-ed: West faces quickly radicalizing Mideast after foolishly lauding Arab uprisings


    IDF Major General Eyal Eisenberg warned last week that the so-called “Arab Spring” may ultimately turn into a “radical Islamic winter.” Recent events in Egypt and elsewhere in the region indicate that this grim assessment is materializing at a rapid pace right before our eyes.

    Foolish Western observers who lauded the “great revolutions” sweeping the Middle East have displayed profound ignorance, failing to comprehend that the region is woefully unprepared for democracy. In this respect, the downfall of brutal tyrants – a pleasing development in and of itself - is worthless if followed by greater evils.

    Regrettably, the growing Mideastern chaos has shattered any semblance of regional stability, allowing the darkest, most radical forces to erupt and increasingly set the tone. What we saw in Egypt over the weekend was merely the beginning. Much worse is yet to come.

    Arab affairs expert Guy Bechor notes that the siege and near-lynch at Israel’s Cairo embassy is first and foremost a domestic affair, reflecting the great deterioration on Egypt’s streets. The orgy of violence and lawlessness we witnessed marks the rise of Islamists and street thugs and the State’s declining ability to impose law and order.

    While Egypt’s misfortune may hold grave regional and global implications, the first to pay the price for this tragedy will be ordinary Egyptians. Hence, it is no wonder that one of the revolution’s symbols, Wael Ghonim, said over the weekend that "what we are witnessing now is contrary to what I dreamt of. We need to wake up quickly.” Unfortunately for him, he and his countrymen are already deeply embroiled in a nightmare.

    The Palestine lesson
    Egypt is of course not the only state where chaos reigns supreme ahead of an uncertain, frightening future. In Libya, rebels are dusting off what’s left of Muammar Gaddafi’s regime, under the leadership of none other than “former Jihadist” Abdel Hakim Belhaj. The Islamic militant has downplayed his past, insisting that he seeks no revenge despite the torture he experienced in prison courtesy of the West. How sincere are his words? Only time will tell.

    What is certain, however, is that the post-revolution Tripoli has already become a menace to regional stability. Last week, Israeli officials warned that Palestinians in Gaza have acquired anti-aircraft and anti-tank rockets from Libya. Meanwhile, the European Union’s counter-terrorism’s chief warned that al-Qaeda may have also secured arms looted in the Libyan conflict, including surface-to-air missiles that could threaten commercial airliners.

    Europe’s Terror Chief Gilles de Kerchove went even further, stressing that “democracy does not happen overnight” and cautioning that the string of Arab world uprisings has “provided a huge opportunity for al-Qaeda to re-energize.” Such warnings would have been much more meaningful six months ago, but at the time much of the West was celebrating the “imminent rise of Mideastern democracies.”

    The failure to predict the Arab Spring’s grim outcome is a huge fiasco, especially as the ensuing calamity should have been patently clear to anyone with minimal understanding of our volatile region. Yet as is often the case, many in Europe and America chose to put their trust in empty words and cheerful notions completely detached from reality, while dismissing common sense and the Arab world’s history and tradition. They too will be paying the price sooner or later.

    The lesson learned from the Arab Spring is particularly relevant this month as the Palestinians prepare to submit their UN statehood bid. This too is an obvious case of pretty rhetoric masking bleak realities on the ground. The Palestinian entity in the West Bank does not meet the minimal criteria for viable statehood, with global recognition likely paving the way for a failed, terrorist state on Israel’s doorstep. Will the world be wise enough to avert such catastrophe? Sadly, the Arab Spring debacle leaves little room for optimism.

    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4120426,00.html
     
  4. AroundTheWorld

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    duplicate
     
    #4 AroundTheWorld, Sep 11, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2011
  5. Dairy Ashford

    Dairy Ashford Member

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    It's hard to be Jewish, it's hard to be Jewish, it's hard to be Jewish in Egypt.
     
  6. bbllr3431

    bbllr3431 Member

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    Ya lets forget the fact that Israel killed five Egyptian policemen across the border. This war has many guilty parties not just one. I don't understand how Americans can trust Israel after Mossad agents were seen celebrating and filming the 9/11 attacks. Israel is disliked by the civilians of each surrounding country but they had friends like Mubarak in power. Civilians don't matter in this world anymore. All that matters is the powers that be, the ones with money and power, and corporations. Even in America
     
  7. bbllr3431

    bbllr3431 Member

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    Jews have been persecuted in every country they've been in. Russia denied them full citizenship, America didn't allow Jewish immigrants for awhile, Britain abandoned their efforts to create a Jewish state and openly held border wars with them. But people now just look at the Arabs as the main enemies of ISRAEL. When in the past everyone treated jewish people as second class human beings. What people forget is that the Arab nations contain CHRISTIANS and MUSLIMS alike who disagree with ISRAEL being there. The UN or league of nations can't remember what it was at that time. Set up boundaries for Israel. They effectively took land from palestinians and created a new state where they lived. If the UN came to Texas and gave away my state to other people I would be pissed too. Furthermore, true Jews attest to the fact that Zionism is a political movement not a religious one. Politics destroys the world not religion.
    I would also like to point out that during WW2 there was a company called IG Farben that helped Hitler establish concentration camps. There was American corroboration and support for this company by John Rockefeller and other oil and steel companies. Countries aren't at war with each other. CORPORATIONS ARE AT WAR WITH US.
     
  8. geeimsobored

    geeimsobored Contributing Member

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    What does that have to do with anything? Yes Israel was wrong there but that doesn't mean ramsacking the Israeli embassy in Cairo is ok. Egypt is eager to show that it has changed and is on the road to democracy but stable countries don't have mobs that attack embassies (regardless of what country's embassy they are attacking).

    That's how most protests in the Muslim world are started. I know in Indian Kashmir, its a general rule of thumb to never go outside on Fridays because imams stir up the crowds during the Friday prayers and they start protesting. (although I find those protests have far more legitimacy than people attacking a foreign embassy) Strictly speaking, it makes sense considering you have large groups of people congregating together on Friday so naturally it would be easy to organize them from there.
     
  9. bbllr3431

    bbllr3431 Member

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    They're protesting because their is no reform. They're not allowing the wool to be pulled over their eyes. The Israeli backed Mubarak was in power and denied freedoms. Egyptians don't want one corrupt regime to be replaced by another which happens so often. See Afghanistan or Iraq or Egypt for proof. So often people think they've accomplished change and rest on their laurels. The Egyptian people aren't allowing that to happen. That's why they protest again. Now about tearing down their embassy. Each side is guilty of faults. Assaulting an embassy should never be allowed. But Israel chased Egyptian policemen into Egyptian land and killed them. I don't think they have jurisdiction in Egyptian lands to kill.
     
  10. Northside Storm

    Northside Storm Contributing Member

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    Netanyahu better be grateful that Obama and America saved his ass and got the Egyptians to put this on lockdown, this give-take relationship would be hilarious if it wasn't such a disruptive force in the Middle East.
     
  11. Don FakeFan

    Don FakeFan Member

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    Wasn't Chinese embassy has been bombed by US in 1999 because of a "map"?
    Wasn't North Korea embassy was "mistakenly" bombed by Nato in Libya this year?

    "Assaulting an embassy should never be allowed.".....no, not in the books of Western politics.
     
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  12. geeimsobored

    geeimsobored Contributing Member

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    Did anyone suggest bombing the Chinese embassy was ok?
     
  13. Carl Herrera

    Carl Herrera Contributing Member

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    Arab Spring is exposed because people got angry at Israel killing Egyptian police?
     
  14. Carl Herrera

    Carl Herrera Contributing Member

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    "Arab Spring" got exposed just now because a protest over Egyptian police getting killed by the Israelis got out of hand? We didn't know Israel wasn't popular among Egyptians before this?

    We thought democratic movements are going to make Arabs all Israel-friendly right away and feel great Israel's right wing policies and treatment of Palestinians?
     
  15. Zboy

    Zboy Contributing Member

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    This is to be expected. Mubarak was bought out by Israel and US. Dont expect the ties to remain the same without him suppressing his own people.

    This is a good example of why you cannot have "democracy" in the Arab world, the way US and Israel wants it, with Israel's policy as it stands.

    This is also why folks who are pro-Israel are nervous about Arab people ousting their leaders/dictators.

    You cant bake your democracy cookie and eat it too.
     
  16. Zboy

    Zboy Contributing Member

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    Yeah, this was conveniently left out.
     
  17. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    Let's not forget that the Israelis were legitimately pursuing militants dressed as Egyptian police officers and who had killed Israeli civilians.
     
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  18. AroundTheWorld

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    I guess you mean the op-ed piece? Because it was certainly not left out in the first article I posted.

    But "getting angry" (as Van Gundier is trying to downplay it) and ransacking a foreign embassy, threatening to murder the people inside, etc., are different things.
     
  19. Sweet Lou 4 2

    Sweet Lou 4 2 Contributing Member
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    And your point is what?

    So if some gang in Mexico who had killed tons of Mexican innocent citizens ran into the U.S. and disguised themselves as American border patrol, than it would be understandable if the Mexican army killed some American border patrol guards near the Texas border, right?
     
  20. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    If the Mexican army were in pursuit of the disguised border patrol agents and real border patrol agents were accidentally killed in the fog of battle then it would be a horrible error but understandable.

    It doesn't make it right, nor any less horrendous, but it would be the reality of the situation. As sad as that may be, I think your example is spot on.
     

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