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[College Admissions] Easier to get in to in-state or out-of-state public university?

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout' started by OrangeRowdy95, Aug 26, 2012.

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Easier to get in to a top in-state public university or out-of-state public school?

  1. Getting admission in-state is a piece of cake

    24 vote(s)
    66.7%
  2. Easier for decent student to go to competitive out-of-state school than top in-state

    12 vote(s)
    33.3%
  1. OrangeRowdy95

    OrangeRowdy95 Contributing Member

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    I was having a debate with a friend. He said it's harder to get in to an out-of-state public university than the top in-state public university. I know back in the day, that used to be the case because state schools tried to take in-state kids...but today, I have seen through personal experience that it's way different.

    Here are some examples. I had a friend get in to the University of Chicago but he didn't even get in to UT. I know several kids who weren't anywhere close to the smartest students in the class (so they obviously didn't get in to UT), but they got in to UNC, Berkeley, UCLA, Michigan, Georgia Tech, and UVA (and many other good state schools). Had these individuals lived in the respective states of these state schools, the only way they would have gotten in is if they attended a not-so-good public school and been the top of their class.

    Hell, I screwed up academically in high school and still got in to the only two out-of-state public schools I applied to (Missouri and Michigan). It would have taken a miracle to get in to those schools had I lived in those respective states with my crappy profile.

    The argument basically started because I said it's actually difficult to get in to UConn if you're a Connecticut resident and it's hard to get in to Berkeley/UCLA if you're a Cal resident. I said it would be easier to get in if someone with the same smarts and application profile applied as an out-of-state resident because of the higher out-of-state tuition.

    I then dug up these articles about higher admittance rates among out-of-state students at public universities:

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lan...-out-of-state-and-international-freshmen.html

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articl...ls-give-an-edge-to-out-of-state-students.html

    So...what are your thoughts?

    Thanks.
     
    #1 OrangeRowdy95, Aug 26, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2012
  2. OrangeRowdy95

    OrangeRowdy95 Contributing Member

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    And by in-state vs out-of-state, the schools have to be comparable. So you can't say it's easier to get in to Univ. of Wyoming than Berkeley if you're a Wyoming resident.

    For example, if you live in North Carolina, would it be easier to get in to UNC or would someone from another state who had the same profile as you get in...or if you live in Texas, would it be easier to get in to UT or would someone from another state with the same profile as you get in...or if you live in Virginia, would it be easier to get in to UVA or would someone from another state with the same profile as you get in...

    You get the drift. I bring this up again because had I applied to Michigan/Missouri with my profile as an in-state resident, I know for sure I wouldn't have gotten in.
     
    #2 OrangeRowdy95, Aug 26, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2012
  3. Dairy Ashford

    Dairy Ashford Member

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    I doubt it's easier or harder, but you have a better idea of the quality of schools in your home state, so you're more willing to look at the crappier ones.
     
  4. dharocks

    dharocks Contributing Member

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    I think it varies.

    Tuition is different story...
     
  5. xcrunner51

    xcrunner51 Contributing Member

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    Texas is a pretty bad example. The top % rule really skews the types of people who get admitted to/rejected from UT. Plenty of students between the 10.1-20th percentile at strong public schools are forced to go out of state because of that rule. They're perfectly fine students and in many instances are better overall applicants than some in the top 10% because they're more likely to be well-rounded than top 10%ers at ****ty schools.

    Side note, one thing I learned in medical school is that public schools do love students who will pay full tuition (out-of-state/international students). I'm not saying that will get you in to an out-of-state school but it definitely plays a role.
     
  6. RedRedemption

    RedRedemption Contributing Member

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    Yup.
    I'm top 3% in my school, but at Seven Lakes I would be top 15%. Lmao.
    Although Katy ISD > HISD so my school is only relatively ****ty compared to other Katy ISD schools. :p
     
  7. BigMaloe

    BigMaloe Contributing Member

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    I think i was bottom 3%...

    Lonestar college baby
     
  8. RedNation

    RedNation Contributing Member

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    Lol. You're an inspiration to us all man. Keep drinking :grin:
     
  9. ItsMyFault

    ItsMyFault Contributing Member

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    In-state is generally easier but it varies.
     
  10. DudeWah

    DudeWah Member

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    It can depend, but in my experience in state kids get extremely preferential treatment in some instances especially at UC schools. Not to mention the financial packages are heavily skewed towards in state residents.

    At least that's what I felt and I got into pretty much every UC school when I applied.
     
  11. BigBird

    BigBird Contributing Member

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    I was in the 9th percentile in my graduating class with good act/sat scores, only 2 Bs in high school, but because of the top 8% auto-admin for UT for my graduating class I didn't get in. Trying to transfer there from UGA for next semester, have a good GPA and a decent amount of credit, hope to get in. So I would say easier to get in out-of-state than in-state, but I'm just going off of my experience.
     
  12. xcrunner51

    xcrunner51 Contributing Member

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    I would hope they have done the longitudinal studies to demonstrate if the top % rule actually leads to improved outcomes for students from weaker schools.

    I personally was top 14% percent of my graduating high school class and am currently in my last year of medical school. I ended up fine, but I think going to UT would have been much easier.
     
  13. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Insider Newsletter™ 2X Diamond Member

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    It varies. California is hard up for money and the pathetic cuts on its uni system has made them resort to foreign and out of state tuition money.

    10 yrs before, it was easier to get a leg up on it in-state.
     
  14. da_juice

    da_juice Member

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    New Jersey's weird too. In some cases, it's cheaper to go to out of state in nearby PA (there's a lot of cheap schools there) versus going in state at Rutgers (which is supposed to be our state university).
     
  15. JuanValdez

    JuanValdez Contributing Member

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    Same with me. Actually, I did get into UT, but I applied for their special school for smart people (can't remember what they called it) and was rejected. This was 1993. I was also rejected by Rice, but accepted by U of C and Boston University. I went to Chicago. But, also at that time, U Chicago was having a branding/marketing crisis and didn't have enough applicants whereas everyone and his dog applied to UT. Even so, I definitely felt I was at a disadvantage with UT and Rice because I lived in Houston. They brag so much about their diversity, it had to be harder to differentiatte yourself when you're from the home state.

    I imagine it's different for each school though. The 10% rule came after my time and it probably made it a lot harder for out-of-state applicants. Other places are probably different. Private schools have a whole different dynamic too. U Chicago was all about your academics and didn't care about any extra-curriculars that make you interesting; whereas Rice was big into that stuff.
     
  16. B-Bob

    B-Bob my celli weighs a ton
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    Totally varies, in every imaginable way. Will depend on if you're in a state that doesn't send many kids to school X. (e.g. the Wyoming example is a good one, since maybe UT doesn't find many kids from Wyoming, but they want a representative spread outside of Texas.) Will depend on your highschool work enormously, and not just grades. Some schools really like to see highschool athletics, while others don't care. Will depend on your gender, as schools struggle to get male students. And so on!
     
  17. da_juice

    da_juice Member

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    If you're really adventurous, send a few applications to some foreign schools. You'll be more attractive (as an international student) and they're typically cheaper if not shorter. For instance, in the UK college is only three years long and cost about the same as a public university here.
     
  18. Ziggy

    Ziggy 99ers STAND BY
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    I believe in Texas going to a comparable school in a bordering outside state is easier. Arizona, Oklahoma, Louisiana, etc... offer special packages to Texans because we have a larger number of people and we're also smarter than the folks in those states apparently. They do things to poach the talent.

    Other than that I'm not sure there's a direct correlation that would be consistent across all states. For example, I imagine getting into a premier school in Michigan/Illinois might be tougher than usual since there are so many solid programs and people coming from all over the world to attend.
     

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