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Church: Obama, NSA, Verizon

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by basso, Jun 5, 2013.

  1. basso

    basso Contributing Member
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    <iframe width="853" height="480" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/QwiUVUJmGjs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    On March 12, at a hearing of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Wyden asked Clapper: "Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?" Clapper responded: "No, sir." When Wyden followed up by asking, "It does not?" Clapper said: "Not wittingly. There are cases where they could, inadvertently perhaps, collect—but not wittingly."​
     
  2. basso

    basso Contributing Member
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    NYTimes:

    [rquoter]President Obama’s Dragnet
    By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
    Published: June 6, 2013 63 Comments

    Within hours of the disclosure that the federal authorities routinely collect data on phone calls Americans make, regardless of whether they have any bearing on a counterterrorism investigation, the Obama administration issued the same platitude it has offered every time President Obama has been caught overreaching in the use of his powers: Terrorists are a real menace and you should just trust us to deal with them because we have internal mechanisms (that we are not going to tell you about) to make sure we do not violate your rights.

    Those reassurances have never been persuasive — whether on secret warrants to scoop up a news agency’s phone records or secret orders to kill an American suspected of terrorism — especially coming from a president who once promised transparency and accountability. The administration has now lost all credibility. Mr. Obama is proving the truism that the executive will use any power it is given and very likely abuse it. That is one reason we have long argued that the Patriot Act, enacted in the heat of fear after the 9/11 attacks by members of Congress who mostly had not even read it, was reckless in its assignment of unnecessary and overbroad surveillance powers.

    Based on an article in The Guardian published Wednesday night, we now know the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National Security Agency used the Patriot Act to obtain a secret warrant to compel Verizon’s business services division to turn over data on every single call that went through its system. We know that this particular order was a routine extension of surveillance that has been going on for years, and it seems very likely that it extends beyond Verizon’s business division. There is every reason to believe the federal government has been collecting every bit of information about every American’s phone calls except the words actually exchanged in those calls.

    A senior administration official quoted in The Times offered the lame observation that the information does not include the name of any caller, as though there would be the slightest difficulty in matching numbers to names. He said the information “has been a critical tool in protecting the nation from terrorist threats,” because it allows the government “to discover whether known or suspected terrorists have been in contact with other persons who may be engaged in terrorist activities, particularly people located inside the United States.”

    That is a vital goal, but how is it served by collecting everyone’s call data? The government can easily collect phone records (including the actual content of those calls) on “known or suspected terrorists” without logging every call made. In fact, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act was expanded in 2008 for that very purpose. Essentially, the administration is saying that without any individual suspicion of wrongdoing, the government is allowed to know who Americans are calling every time they make a phone call, for how long they talk and from where.

    This sort of tracking can reveal a lot of personal and intimate information about an individual. To casually permit this surveillance — with the American public having no idea that the executive branch is now exercising this power — fundamentally shifts power between the individual and the state, and repudiates constitutional principles governing search, seizure and privacy.

    The defense of this practice offered by Senator Dianne Feinstein of California, who as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee is supposed to be preventing this sort of overreaching, was absurd. She said today that the authorities need this information in case someone might become a terrorist in the future. Senator Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, the vice chairman of the committee, said the surveillance has “proved meritorious, because we have gathered significant information on bad guys and only on bad guys over the years.”

    But what assurance do we have of that, especially since Ms. Feinstein went on to say that she actually did not know how the data being collected was used?

    The senior administration official quoted in The Times said the executive branch internally reviews surveillance programs to ensure that they “comply with the Constitution and laws of the United States and appropriately protect privacy and civil liberties.”

    That’s no longer good enough. Mr. Obama clearly had no intention of revealing this eavesdropping, just as he would not have acknowledged the killing of Anwar al-Awlaki, an American citizen, had it not been reported in the press. Even then, it took him more than a year and a half to acknowledge the killing, and he is still keeping secret the protocol by which he makes such decisions.

    We are not questioning the legality under the Patriot Act of the court order disclosed by The Guardian. But we strongly object to using that power in this manner. It is the very sort of thing against which Mr. Obama once railed, when he said in 2007 that the Bush administration’s surveillance policy “puts forward a false choice between the liberties we cherish and the security we provide.”

    Two Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee, Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon and Senator Mark Udall of Colorado, have raised warnings about the government’s overbroad interpretation of its surveillance powers. “We believe most Americans would be stunned to learn the details of how these secret court opinions have interpreted Section 215 of the Patriot Act,” they wrote last year in a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. “As we see it, there is now a significant gap between what most Americans think the law allows and what the government secretly claims the law allows. This is a problem, because it is impossible to have an informed public debate about what the law should say when the public doesn’t know what its government thinks the law says.”

    On Thursday, Representative Jim Sensenbrenner, Republican of Wisconsin, who introduced the Patriot Act in 2001, said that the National Security Agency overstepped its bounds by issuing a secret order to collect phone log records from millions of Americans. “As the author of the Patriot Act, I am extremely troubled by the F.B.I.’s interpretation of this legislation,” he said in a statement. “While I believe the Patriot Act appropriately balanced national security concerns and civil rights, I have always worried about potential abuses.” He added: “Seizing phone records of millions of innocent people is excessive and un-American.”

    This stunning use of the act shows, once again, why it needs to be sharply curtailed if not repealed.[/rquoter]
     
  3. basso

    basso Contributing Member
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    WaPo:

    [rquoter]U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies in broad secret program

    The National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies, extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents and connection logs that enable analysts to track a person’s movements and contacts over time.

    The highly classified program, code-named PRISM, has not been disclosed publicly before. Its establishment in 2007 and six years of exponential growth took place beneath the surface of a roiling debate over the boundaries of surveillance and privacy. Even late last year, when critics of the foreign intelligence statute argued for changes, the only members of Congress who know about PRISM were bound by oaths of office to hold their tongues.

    Related stories
    ‘No Such Agency’ spies on the communications of the world

    Anne Gearan 5:35 PM ET
    The National Security Agency, nicknamed such for years, is the U.S. government’s eavesdropper-in-chief.
    Report: NSA asked Verizon for all U.S. call data

    Ellen Nakashima 7:51 AM ET
    If document requiring company to submit phone records for millions of Americans is authentic, it would be the broadest surveillance order known to date.
    All about the NSA surveillance program.

    Timothy B. Lee 3:46 PM ET
    What has the government been doing? Is it legal? Does it mean some bureaucrat somewhere has heard all your phone calls? Read on to find out.

    An internal presentation on the Silicon Valley operation, intended for senior analysts in the NSA’s Signals Intelligence Directorate, described the new tool as the most prolific contributor to the President’s Daily Brief, which cited PRISM data in 1,477 articles last year. According to the briefing slides, obtained by The Washington Post, “NSA reporting increasingly relies on PRISM” as its leading source of raw material, accounting for nearly 1 in 7 intelligence reports.

    That is a remarkable figure in an agency that measures annual intake in the trillions of communications. It is all the more striking because the NSA, whose lawful mission is foreign intelligence, is reaching deep inside the machinery of American companies that host hundreds of millions of American-held accounts on American soil.

    The technology companies, which participate knowingly in PRISM operations, include most of the dominant global players of Silicon Valley. They are listed on a roster that bears their logos in order of entry into the program: “Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, PalTalk, AOL, Skype, YouTube, Apple.” PalTalk, although much smaller, has hosted significant traffic during the Arab Spring and in the ongoing Syrian civil war.

    Dropbox , the cloud storage and synchronization service, is described as “coming soon.”

    Government officials declined to comment for this story.[/rquoter]

    i need to find somewhere else to store my p*rn.
     
  4. Blake

    Blake Contributing Member

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  5. mc mark

    mc mark Contributing Member

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    I'm shocked, SHOCKED that there's gambling going on in here!
     
  6. bobmarley

    bobmarley Contributing Member

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    Bombshell Report: NSA, FBI Tapping Servers Of 9 Top Internet Companies To Gain Access To Americans Emails, Photos, Messages…

    [​IMG]

    Whoever leaked this to the WaPo better flee the country because Holder is going to come down on them with a vengeance.

    Via WaPo:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/inves...0c0da8-cebf-11e2-8845-d970ccb04497_story.html

    The National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies, extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents and connection logs that enable analysts to track a person’s movements and contacts over time.

    The highly classified program, code-named PRISM, has not been disclosed publicly before. Its establishment in 2007 and six years of exponential growth took place beneath the surface of a roiling debate over the boundaries of surveillance and privacy. Even late last year, when critics of the foreign intelligence statute argued for changes, the only members of Congress who know about PRISM were bound by oaths of office to hold their tongues.

    An internal presentation on the Silicon Valley operation, intended for senior analysts in the NSA’s Signals Intelligence Directorate, described the new tool as the most prolific contributor to the President’s Daily Brief, which cited PRISM data in 1,477 articles last year. According to the briefing slides, obtained by The Washington Post, “NSA reporting increasingly relies on PRISM” as its leading source of raw material, accounting for nearly 1 in 7 intelligence reports.

    That is a remarkable figure in an agency that measures annual intake in the trillions of communications. It is all the more striking because the NSA, whose lawful mission is foreign intelligence, is reaching deep inside the machinery of American companies that host hundreds of millions of American-held accounts on American soil.

    The technology companies, which participate knowingly in PRISM operations, include most of the dominant global players of Silicon Valley. They are listed on a roster that bears their logos in order of entry into the program: “Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, PalTalk, AOL, Skype, YouTube, Apple.” PalTalk, although much smaller, has hosted significant traffic during the Arab Spring and in the ongoing Syrian civil war.

    Keep reading…
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/inves...0c0da8-cebf-11e2-8845-d970ccb04497_story.html
     
  7. bobmarley

    bobmarley Contributing Member

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    Government Source On Why He Leaked NSA’s Secret PRISM Program: “Horror At Their Capabilities,” “They Can Literally Watch Your Ideas Form As You Type”…

    [​IMG]

    Chilling to say the least.

    Via Politico:
    http://www.politico.com/blogs/media...leaked-prism-165623.html#.UbEN7A7jf9Q.twitter
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/inves...0c0da8-cebf-11e2-8845-d970ccb04497_story.html

    The Washington Post has published a remarkable report showing that the National Security Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation have been monitoring the central servers of major Internet companies — Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, PalTalk, AOL, Skype, YouTube and Apple — and “extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents and connection logs that enable analysts to track a person’s movements and contacts over time.”

    Why did a government source leak information of this program, dubbed “PRISM,” to the Post? What follows is perhaps the most chilling paragraph I’ve read to date about U.S. government surveillance:

    “Firsthand experience with these systems, and horror at their capabilities, is what drove a career intelligence officer to provide PowerPoint slides about PRISM and supporting materials to The Washington Post in order to expose what he believes to be a gross intrusion on privacy. “They quite literally can watch your ideas form as you type,” the officer said.”

    Keep reading…
    http://www.politico.com/blogs/media...leaked-prism-165623.html#.UbEN7A7jf9Q.twitter
     
  8. bobmarley

    bobmarley Contributing Member

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    This is an utter travesty.

    [​IMG]

    NSA's Verizon Spying Order Specifically Targeted Americans, Not Foreigners

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygre...ecifically-targeted-americans-not-foreigners/

     
    #48 bobmarley, Jun 6, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2013
  9. Ubiquitin

    Ubiquitin Contributing Member
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    Brave New World
     
  10. mc mark

    mc mark Contributing Member

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    thank you Bush, thank you Patriot Act

    there were those of us that said this would happen and we were laughed at and called unamerican, oh well...
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Contributing Member

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    ^I'm not even sure what that response is...apology, excuse, deflection?

    If people are angry about it, now's the time for change.
     
  12. KingCheetah

    KingCheetah Contributing Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  13. Ubiquitin

    Ubiquitin Contributing Member
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    Write your senator and ask for a repeal.
     
  14. mc mark

    mc mark Contributing Member

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    What was it the apologists used to say?

    "If you haven't done anything wrong, you've got nothing to worry about". "We're just looking for the bad guys".

    So Fuc your outrage
     
    #54 mc mark, Jun 6, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2013
  15. bobmarley

    bobmarley Contributing Member

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    And this is a boob.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Ubiquitin

    Ubiquitin Contributing Member
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    That's United States President Barack Obama.
     
  17. KingCheetah

    KingCheetah Contributing Member

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    Your post is utterly ridiculous.
     
  18. basso

    basso Contributing Member
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    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. mc mark

    mc mark Contributing Member

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    What will really blow your mind about *******'s post is that he completely agrees with what the President is doing to keep the US safe.
     
  20. basso

    basso Contributing Member
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    [​IMG]
     

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