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[Breaking] Texas lawmakers IMPEACH Attorney General Ken Paxton

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by Xerobull, May 25, 2023.

  1. London'sBurning

    London'sBurning Contributing Member

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  2. peleincubus

    peleincubus Member

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    Good. Now go fix your eye buddy.
     
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  3. DatRocketFan

    DatRocketFan Member

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    The retaliation from vindictive Paxton will b insane. Grab your popcorn
     
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  4. DaDakota

    DaDakota If you want to know, just ask!

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    Turns out they are too crooked themselves to convict a fellow crook.

    DD
     
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  5. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    The only sham committed was the political exoneration of a corrupt official.

    He can't hide from his crimes forever and the morally bankrupt Republican legislature can't protect him from his federal charges.

    He's stalled his securities fraud case since 2015, but his reckoning is coming.

    Not to mention the federal charges to come for the very crimes that the legislature whitewashed today.

    tick tock
     
  6. Nook

    Nook Member

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    I don’t know - but for such a financially successful lawyer, he is really lacking in style and grooming.

    That style shirt has been out of style for over a decade and his color scheme is terrible. His haircut and styling is busboy level.

    Appearances matter a lot to this man - so he needs to hire a personal stylist to groom him and pick out his clothes. My guess is he thinks he looks like Pat Riley when he really looks like an extra from the movie Stand and Deliver.
     
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  7. DatRocketFan

    DatRocketFan Member

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    I don't understand why can't they just find a less corrupt republican to b the attorney General. He's gonna now ask the state to pony money for his lawsuits that he's clearly at fault
     
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  8. Buck Turgidson

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    Everytime I see Paxton I'm reminded of a certain scene in Deadwood.
     
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  9. hooroo

    hooroo Member

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    patrick "was not silent for months". when asked about paxton he chose to barrack for him and turned it into an attack on phelan instead. he was biased all the way.
     
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  10. AleksandarN

    AleksandarN Member

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    https://media.tenor.com/vYa71W5Mh2UAAAAC/tick-tock-mother****er.gif
     
  11. ryan_98

    ryan_98 Contributing Member
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  12. dobro1229

    dobro1229 Contributing Member

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    Wouldn’t be surprised if the whole impeachment was essentially staged to try and remove the cloud that was over Paxton’s head.

    The Texas leadership stinks to high heaven of corruption and with stacked courts in their favor there’s no surprise they feel untouchable. Of that is after they deal with pesky Harris County where they just need to be able to throw out the votes of which is exactly what they are attempting to do out there in the open.
     
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  13. astros123

    astros123 Member

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  14. Buck Turgidson

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    That's pretty silly, if you understand Texas politics.
     
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  15. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    Nice article from the New Yorker...(excerpted below)

    The Ken Paxton Verdict Is Not the Vindication Republicans Want
    In 2018, when Ken Paxton ran for reëlection as Texas’s attorney general, he was under state and federal indictments for securities fraud, and he also had a reputation for pettier malfeasance. Justin Nelson, his Democratic opponent, decided to make Paxton’s questionable ethical judgment central to his campaign. “I really just tried to ridicule the dude, and highlight the base venality of the corruption,” Nelson told me recently. Not long before the election, Nelson’s campaign obtained security-camera footage from 2013 of the entrance to the courthouse in Collin County, where Paxton lives. In the grainy video, Paxton, wearing a suit and carrying a briefcase, spies a Montblanc pen that someone has left behind at a metal detector. Paxton slips the thousand-dollar pen into his pocket, then walks away. (After a sheriff’s deputy contacted him a few days later, Paxton returned the pen, saying he took it by mistake.) The video was widely viewed; Paxton won the election anyway, by three points.

    Paxton has long been dogged by allegations of fraud, corruption, and general impropriety—his state securities-fraud charges date from 2015—but, until recently, he seemed impervious to them. (He pleaded not guilty to the state charges, and no trial date has been set.) In October, 2020, eight of Paxton’s ex-employees, all high-level staffers in the Texas attorney general’s office, accused their former boss of bribery, abuse of office, and other federal and state crimes. Last fall, Paxton was reëlected again, this time by a margin of nearly ten points.
    ***
    The testimony was at times dramatic, and the prosecution emphasized that the witnesses testifying against Paxton were not motivated by partisanship. (When one was asked how conservative he was, on a scale of one to ten, he rated himself an eleven.) Part of the prosecution’s closing statement was delivered by the state representative Jeff Leach, a Republican, who described Paxton as a friend and mentor. “I have loved Ken Paxton for a long time,” he said, before urging the senators to remove Paxton from office. On Saturday, Paxton was acquitted of the sixteen charges against him, in a largely party-line vote.
    ***
    The impeachment charges stemmed from Paxton’s relationship with Nate Paul, the developer. Paul, the son of immigrants from India, bought his first piece of real estate, a thirteen-unit apartment building, after completing his freshman year at the University of Texas at Austin. He eventually dropped out of college, and, around the time he was twenty-two, his business started raising a twenty-five-million-dollar investment from the Austin Police Retirement System. Paul’s timing was fortuitous: not long after he started the business, the 2008 recession hit, and he bought properties during a period of low interest rates and prices, and he saw their valuations rise precipitously during Austin’s tech-fuelled boom. In 2014, “Nate Paul” was the most-searched phrase on the Austin Business Journal’s Web site; three years later, Paul, then thirty, told Forbes that he had “kind of cornered the market on potential office space in downtown Austin.”

    But soon there were signs of trouble. In 2018, Paul’s businesses began to default on reportedly hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of loans. The next year, his office and home were raided by the F.B.I. (In June, Paul was indicted on eight counts of lying to financial institutions in order to get loans. According to the indictment, he provided crudely doctored financial statements indicating, for example, that an account held $18.5 million when it actually held only twelve thousand dollars. Paul had previously denied wrongdoing in the case.) Paul believed that the raid was politically motivated, and he wanted the attorney general’s office to intervene. According to one of the whistle-blowers, Paxton thought that his securities-fraud charges were the result of a biased investigation, and was a willing listener. But his deputies were skeptical. Paxton’s former head of law enforcement, a gruff veteran Texas Ranger named David Maxwell, testified that he warned his boss against getting involved with Paul. “I told him Nate Paul was a criminal, that he was running a Ponzi scheme that would rival Billie Sol Estes”—a notorious Texas fraudster—“and that, if he didn’t get away from this individual and stop doing what he was doing, he was gonna get himself indicted.” Paxton’s and Paul’s legal representatives didn't respond to requests for comment.
    ***
    The whistle-blowers’ testimony painted a picture of a dysfunctional office, where the focus on Paul distracted from what they saw as more important priorities: preparing lawsuits challenging Biden’s election; responding to COVID. Bangert testified that, as he and Mateer were about to begin a key meeting about a planned lawsuit against Google, Paxton telephoned, wanting to talk about another Nate Paul matter. (With the spotlight on the attorney general’s office, pettier complaints began to emerge as well. Several former employees told the Associated Press about a coconut cake that H-E-B sends to the attorney general’s office every Christmas. The staff used to share the cake, but when Paxton took over he reportedly kept it for himself.)
    ***
    In late September, one of the banks that had received a subpoena called the attorney general’s office to make sure it was real. “We have a major problem,” Mateer texted his group chat. “The kid has served a subpoena on a bank. Showed up there in person at the bank.” The group gathered in Mateer’s office. Concluding that, as Bangert put it in his testimony, Nate Paul and his interests “metastasized” in the agency, and that Paxton was “determined to harness the power of our office and to fulfill the interests of a single individual against the interests of the state,” they decided to approach the F.B.I. Doing so felt like they “had stepped into the void,” Bangert testified. “We were protecting the interests of the state and ultimately, I believe, protecting the interests of the attorney general and, in my view, signing our professional death warrant.”
    ***
    Although Paxton will resume his position as attorney general (he had been suspended since the vote to impeach in May), his legal troubles are not over. He still faces state securities-fraud charges, and there may be further fallout from his association with Nate Paul. Paxton’s own lawyer, Dan Cogdell, has speculated that Paul, now facing federal charges, might face pressure to flip on his former friend. (After Saturday’s vote, Cogdell called both the impeachment and the securities-fraud charges “B.S.” “That case, like this one, should have never been brought,” he said. “They ought to dismiss it. And if they don’t dismiss it, we will try them and beat them there just like we beat them here.”)


    Paxton’s acquittal is further evidence that the Republican Party is captive to its most extreme voters. According to recent polling, the more that Texans—including Republicans—learned about Paxton’s actions, the less inclined they were to overlook them. (In contrast, voters’ perceptions of Trump haven’t changed much, despite his numerous indictments.)

    “A lot of what we’re seeing now is the by-product of a party being in power for more than two decades, having total domination of all the statewide offices,” Jennifer Harris, a communications strategist who has worked for a number of Republican officials in Texas, said. “As a partisan, back in the day, I could cheer that on, but I think you can become complacent, disconnected from your own voters.” Harris said that she no longer considers herself a Republican. “The branding-comms person in me is, like, ‘You can’t salvage this brand.’ ”

    “From a very narrow partisan perspective, it’s almost better for the Democrats if he’s acquitted,” Justin Nelson, the former Democratic candidate, told me before the vote. “Then the entire Republican Party is tarred with this corruption, and you can’t separate it out.”
     
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  16. ROCKSS

    ROCKSS Contributing Member

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    The limp dick gop was never going to prosecute one of their own, as trump said, he could shoot someone on 5th avenue and never lose a vote is now the Montra for the entire party, they only care about power................oh well, it's what Texas voted for so if that's your cup of tea then your happy, hopefully they vote his ass out, and Patrick is the biggest scum bag of them all
     
  17. leroy

    leroy Contributing Member

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    The Texas Senate GOP are nothing but f***ing cowards.
     
  18. IBTL

    IBTL Member

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    Exactly. ****ing shitstains.
     
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  19. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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  20. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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