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Breaking 1-06-21: MAGA terrorist attack on Capitol

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by RESINator, Jan 6, 2021.

  1. CrixusTheUndefeatedGaul

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    This right here is why we can’t take you leftist clown seriously. Your holy grail precious Jan 6th was a set up all the way.
     
  2. Commodore

    Commodore Contributing Member

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  3. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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    If he doesn't know, what more does maga massie want... idle speculation?

    OK, to make maga massie happy, it was large marge... the three-toes, shoes, the bleach-blond, bad built butch body all give her away.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Commodore

    Commodore Contributing Member

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    Seeing a new criminal complaint against a J6 defendant this morning -- could be my 60th J6 client. Multiple felony offenses charged -- but not a Sec. 1512(c)(2) "Obstruction of Congress" charge when there would be been such a charge 6 months ago. Another sign DOJ knows it is losing the Fischer case. Yet DOJ management pushed the 20 year felony charge for over three years and forced defendants to plead guilty and accept 3-4 year sentences on it. Not a single DOJ official whose name appears anywhere backing the application of that statute should keep their job past January 20 if Trump wins. This should be a project for the Transition -- ID everyone involved in the decision-making, no matter how tangentially. Escort them from the building and shut down their access at 12:00 pm. The entire Department should be given notice that deleting files or destroying materials will be deemed "obstruction of justice."

     
    #9544 Commodore, May 27, 2024
    Last edited: May 27, 2024
  5. FranchiseBlade

    FranchiseBlade Contributing Member
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    Hold on to that dream.
     
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  6. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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    This shows the true "maga"...

     
    FrontRunner and No Worries like this.
  7. JuanValdez

    JuanValdez Contributing Member

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    Sure, I expect plenty of political retribution if Trump wins.
     
  8. NewRoxFan

    NewRoxFan Contributing Member

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    trump and his maga enablers have already said he would.
     
  9. deb4rockets

    deb4rockets Contributing Member
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    Top Democratic congressman proposes way to force Alito, Thomas off January 6 cases

    Clarence Thomas’s wife called for the 2020 election to be overturned. Samuel Alito had rightwing flags flying at two of his properties. Yet both conservative justices are set to rule on Donald Trump’s claim of immunity from prosecution for his election meddling, despite calls from Democrats that they step back from that and other cases because they are conflicted.

    Congressman Jamie Raskin, proposed a novel way to force the two justices off the case:

    The US Department of Justice – including the US attorney for the District of Columbia, an appointed US special counsel and the solicitor general, all of whom were involved in different ways in the criminal prosecutions underlying these cases and are opposing Mr Trump’s constitutional and statutory claims – can petition the other seven justices to require Justices Alito and Thomas to recuse themselves not as a matter of grace but as a matter of law.

    The Justice Department and Attorney General Merrick Garland can invoke two powerful textual authorities for this motion: the Constitution of the United States, specifically the due process clause, and the federal statute mandating judicial disqualification for questionable impartiality, 28 USC Section 455. The Constitution has come into play in several recent Supreme Court decisions striking down rulings by stubborn judges in lower courts whose political impartiality has been reasonably questioned but who threw caution to the wind to hear a case anyway. This statute requires potentially biased judges throughout the federal system to recuse themselves at the start of the process to avoid judicial unfairness and embarrassing controversies and reversals.

    https://www.theguardian.com/law/live/2024/may/30/supreme-court-trump-immunity-abortion-biden-updates
     
  10. JuanValdez

    JuanValdez Contributing Member

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    I really don't agree with this push to get Alito to recuse. He has a personal political opinion and exercised his first amendment right to express it? What's wrong with that? Are we pretending justices aren't supposed to have political opinions?
     
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  11. FranchiseBlade

    FranchiseBlade Contributing Member
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    I agree with you about Alito but I still have questions, though because of his lies relating directly to the incident.
     
  12. rocketsjudoka

    rocketsjudoka Contributing Member
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    This is a difficult issue but we do expect judges and others in positions where they are supposed to uphold the law to make decisions on that rather than political opinion.

    For example as a local Judo referee I'm frequently in the position of refereeing matches by players I've coached. Because we don't have a lot of Judo Referees I can't just recuse myself from every match where I have a conflict like that. I've often made calls against my players and told them ahead of time don't expect any favors from me when I'm the referee.
     
  13. JuanValdez

    JuanValdez Contributing Member

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    Is there a reason we think Alito cant do that just because he said his opinion out loud? I'm pretty sure all 9 justices have an opinion about Jan 6.
     
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  14. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    • Kevin Louis Galetto, 63, of Merritt Island, Florida, was sentenced to 27 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to civil disorder and assault of a federal officer.
    • Alexander Bennett Sheppard, 24, of Powell, Ohio, was sentenced to serve 19 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $3,170. He was found guilty of multiple charges, including obstruction of an official proceeding, and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building.
    • Connie Meggs, 60, of Dunnellon, Florida, was sentenced to 15 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release. A member of the Oath Keepers far-right group accused of helping organize the uprising, she was convicted of conspiring to obstruct an official proceeding.
    • Ethan Nordean, 32, of Auburn, Washington, was sentenced to 18 years in prison and 36 months of supervised release. A member of the far-right Proud Boys group, he was found guilty of multiple felonies including conspiracy to obstruct an official proceeding.
    • Dominic Pezzola, 45, of Rochester, New York, also a member of Proud Boys, was sentenced to 10 years in prison and 36 months of supervised release. The group is thought to have also helped organize the uprising.
    • Joseph Randall Biggs, 39, of Ormond Beach, Florida, was sentenced to 17 years in prison and 36 months of supervised release. The DOJ described him as a former Proud Boys leader and was found guilty of multiple felonies including seditious conspiracy.
    • Zachary Rehl, 38, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was sentenced to 15 years in prison and 36 months of supervised release. Another Proud Boys leader, he stood trial with Biggs and was found guilty of similar charges.
    • Narayana C. Rheiner, 42, of Baltimore, Maryland, was sentenced to 15 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000. Rheiner pleaded guilty to one count of interfering with law enforcement officers during a civil disorder.
    • Leo Christopher Kelly, 37, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, was sentenced to 30 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $7,000. He was found guilty at trial of obstructing an official proceeding and six other misdemeanors.
    • Bradley Wayne Weeks, 44, of Macclenny, Florida, was sentenced to 10 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release with 12 months of home detention, and ordered to pay $2,000. He was found guilty of a number of charges, including obstructing an official proceeding, and disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building.
    • Michael Steven Perkins, 40, of Plant City, Florida, was sentenced to 48 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release. He was found guilty of, among other charges, assaulting a federal officer with a deadly or dangerous weapon and civil disorder.
    • Joshua Christopher Doolin, 25, of Lakeland, Florida, was sentenced to 18 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release on a number of charges. He was charged with assaulting a police officer with other rioters—some of whom remain at large, and one of whom was allowed to attend his wedding in 2021.
    • James McNamara, 61, of Chicago, Illinois, was sentenced to 12 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000. He pleaded guilty to one count of assaulting a federal officer.
    • Daniel Dink Phipps, 50, of Garland, Texas, was sentenced to 27 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $270. A former security guard, he previously pleaded guilty to two felony offenses—including one count of assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers and one count of civil disorder—as well as four misdemeanor offenses.
    • Salvador Sandoval, Jr., 26, of Ankeny, Iowa, was sentenced to 88 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000. He was found guilty of four counts of assaulting Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) officers, one count of obstruction of an official proceeding and one count of civil disorder.
     
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  15. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    • Henry "Enrique" Tarrio, 39, of Miami, Florida, was sentenced to 22 years in prison and 36 months of supervised release. The former chair of the Proud Boys, he faces the longest sentence to date in relation to the January 6 uprising.
    • William McCall Calhoun, Jr., 60, of Americus, Georgia, was sentenced to 18 months in prison for obstruction of an official proceeding, among other charges. The DOJ said Calhoun was a practicing attorney in Georgia when sentenced.
    • Thomas F. Sibick, 37, of Buffalo, New York, was sentenced to 50 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $7,500.79. Sibick pleaded guilty to one felony count of assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers and one misdemeanor count of theft.
    • Noah S. Bacon, 30, of Somerville, Massachusetts, was sentenced to 12 months in prison, two years of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000. He was found guilty of obstruction of an official proceeding and several misdemeanor charges.
    • Bruno Joseph Cua, 21, of Milton, Georgia, was sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison and 36 months of supervised release. He was found guilty of two felony charges: obstruction of an official proceeding and assaulting an officer.
    • Brian Gundersen, 28, of State College, Pennsylvania, was sentenced to 18 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000. He was found guilty of two felony charges, including obstruction of an official proceeding and assaulting an officer.
    • Peter Francis Stager, 44, of Conway, Arkansas, was sentenced to 52 months in prison after pleading guilty to assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers using a deadly or dangerous weapon. He was also ordered to serve 36 months of supervised release and pay $2,000.
    • Christopher Michael Alberts, 35, of Pylesville, Maryland, was sentenced to 84 months in prison after being convicted of nine charges—including six felonies—as well as 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000.
    • Audrey Ann Southard-Rumsey, 54, of Spring Hill, Florida, was sentenced to 72 months in prison after she was found guilty of seven felony charges, including three counts of assaulting officers. She was also given 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000.
    • Kevin James Lyons, 40, of Chicago, Illinois, was sentenced to 51 months in prison after being convicted of six charges, including one felony and five misdemeanors. He was also given 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000.
    • Kyle Fitzsimons, 39, of Lebanon, Maine, was sentenced to 87 months in prison after he was convicted of 11 charges, including seven felonies, as well as 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000.
    • Daniel Lyons Scott, 29, of Englewood, Florida, was sentenced to 60 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000. He pleaded guilty to obstructing an official proceeding.
    • Cale Douglas Clayton, 42, of Drexel, Missouri, was sentenced to 30 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to a charge of assaulting an officer.
     
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  16. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    • Matthew Jason Beddingfield, 22, of Middlesex, North Carolina, was sentenced to 38 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to a charge of assaulting an officer.
    • Barry Bennet Ramey, 39, of Plantation, Florida, was sentenced to 60 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 after being found guilty of civil disorder and assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers, as well as several misdemeanors.
    • Joshua Johnson, 32, of Sherman, Texas, was sentenced to 24 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $100 for obstruction of an official proceeding.
    • Robert Gieswein, 26, of Woodland Park, Colorado, was sentenced to 48 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 for two counts of assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers.
    • Jason Douglas Owens, 50, of Blanco, Texas, was sentenced to 24 months in prison, three years of supervised release, and ordered to pay a combined $4,100.
    • Grady Douglas Owens, 22, Jason's son, was sentenced to 37 months in prison, two years of supervised release, and ordered to pay a combined $3,110. He also pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and was sentenced to a concurrent six months in prison.
    • James Robert Elliott, 25, of Aurora, Illinois, was sentenced to 37 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 for assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers.
    • Daniel Joseph "DJ" Rodriguez, 40, of Fontana, California, was sentenced to 151 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 for a number of felony charges including assaulting an officer with a taser. He was also ordered to pay $96,927 to the Metropolitan Police Department for damages to the victim.
    • Mason Joel Courson, 27, of Tamarac, Florida, was sentenced to 57 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to assaulting, resisting, or impeding a law enforcement officer with a dangerous weapon.
    • Thomas B. Adams Jr., 41, of Springfield, Illinois, was sentenced to 14 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 after being found guilty of obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting, as well as a misdemeanor.
    • Mikhail Edward Slye, 32, of Meadville, Pennsylvania, was sentenced to 30 months in prison, 18 months supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to one charge of assaulting, resisting, or impeding law enforcement officers.
    • Michael Lee Roche, 28, of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, was sentenced to 18 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000 after being found guilty of a number of charges, including obstruction of an official proceeding.
    • Markus Maly, 49, of Fincastle, Virginia, was sentenced to 72 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release after being found guilty of a number of charges related to the assaulting of officers.
     
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  17. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    • Roberto Minuta, 39, of Prosper, Texas, a member of the Oath Keepers, was sentenced to 54 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release for a number of charges including seditious conspiracy.
    • Joseph Hackett, 53, of Sarasota, Florida, a member of the Oath Keepers, was sentenced to 42 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release on similar charges to Minuta.
    • David Moerschel, 45, of Punta Gorda, Florida, a member of the Oath Keepers, was sentenced to 36 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release on similar charges to Minuta.
    • Edward Vallejo, 64, of Phoenix, Arizona, a member of the Oath Keepers, was sentenced 36 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release—including the first 12 months to be served on home confinement—on similar charges to Minuta.
    • Barton Wade Shively, 55, of Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, was sentenced to 18 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 for two counts of assaulting law enforcement officers.
    • Pauline Bauer, 55, of Kane, Pennsylvania, was sentenced to 27 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release and fined $2,000 for a number of charges, including obstruction of an official proceeding.
    • Jessica Marie Watkins, 40, of Woodstock, Ohio, an Oath Keepers member, was sentenced to 102 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release after being found guilty of a number of charges including conspiracy to obstruct an official proceeding.
    • Kenneth Harrelson, 42, of Titusville, Florida, also an Oath Keepers member, was sentenced to four years in prison and 24 months of supervised release for obstruction of an official proceeding, conspiracy to prevent an officer from discharging duties, and tampering with documents or proceedings.
    • Luke Michael Lints, 29, of Traverse City, Michigan, was sentenced to four months in prison, followed by 36 months of supervised release, the first four of which will be on home detention, and ordered to pay $2,000 for interfering with law enforcement officers.
    • Nicholas Brockoff, 22, of Covington, Kentucky, was sentenced to 36 months in prison, 36 months supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,700 after he pleaded guilty to assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers with a dangerous weapon.
    • Elmer Stewart Rhodes III, 57, of Granbury, Texas, the founder and leader of the Oath Keepers, was sentenced to 18 years in prison and 36 months of supervised release for seditious conspiracy, among other charges.
    • Kelly Meggs, 53, of Dunnellon, Florida, the leader of the Florida chapter of the Oath Keepers, was sentenced to 12 years in prison and 36 months of supervised release on similar charges to Rhodes.
    • Richard Barnett, 62, of Gravette, Arkansas, was sentenced to 54 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000 fine, after being found guilty of a number of charges, including obstruction of an official proceeding.
    • Robert Morss, 29, of Glenshaw, Pennsylvania, was sentenced to 66 months in prison for assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers with a dangerous weapon, obstruction of an official proceeding, and robbery. He was also given 24 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000.
    • Bernard Joseph Sirr, 47, of North Kingstown, Rhode Island, was sentenced to two months in prison, followed by 12 months of probation with six months of home confinement, and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to assaulting resisting, or impeding law enforcement officers and obstruction of an official proceeding.
    • Christopher Ray Grider, 41, of Eddy, Texas, was sentenced to 83 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay a combined $5,856 after pleading guilty to two counts before trial and later being found guilty of other charges relating to his involvement in the uprising.
     
  18. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    • Julio Baquero, 38, of Hollywood, Florida, was sentenced to 18 months in prison, 12 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to a felony charge of civil disorder.
    • Joshua Lollar, 41, of Spring, Texas, pleaded guilty to obstruction of an official proceeding and was immediately sentenced to 30 months in prison, 12 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 for his involvement in the uprising.
    • Donald Hazard, 44, of Hurst, Texas, was sentenced to 57 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to a charge of assaulting an officer, which the DOJ said caused "bodily injury."
    • Joshua Matthew Black, 46, of Leeds, Alabama, was sentenced to 22 months in prison after being found guilty of three felony charges and two misdemeanors, including disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building with a deadly or dangerous weapon. He was also given 24 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000.
    • Josiah Colt, 34, of Meridian, Idaho, was sentenced to 15 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,000 after pleading guilty to obstruction of an official proceeding.
    • Landon Kenneth Copeland, 34, of Hildale, Utah, was sentenced to 36 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to assaulting, an officer.
    • Peter J. Schwartz, 49, of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, was sentenced to 170 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 for nine felonies and two misdemeanors, including four counts of assaulting, resisting, or impeding law enforcement officers using a dangerous weapon.
    • Deborah Sandoval, 56, of Ankeny, Iowa, was sentenced to five months in prison, 12 months of supervised release and ordered to pay a combined $525 after pleading guilty to entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds.
    • Jeffrey Scott Brown, 56, of Santa Ana, California, was sentenced to 54 months in prison for a number of offenses, including pepper spraying an officer of the law.
    • Christian Matthew Manley, 27, of Fort Walton Beach, Florida, was sentenced to 50 months incarceration, 36 months supervised release, and ordered to pay a combined $2,100 after pleading guilty to assaulting, resisting, and impeding law enforcement while using a dangerous weapon.
    • Jacob Michael Therres, 25, of Fallston, Maryland, was sentenced to 40 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 for assaulting, resisting or impeding an officer with a dangerous weapon.
    • Patrick Edward McCaughey III, 25, of Ridgefield, Connecticut, was sentenced to 90 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 after being found guilty of nine offenses, including three counts of aiding or abetting or assaulting, resisting, or impeding law enforcement officers, including one involving a dangerous weapon.
    • Vincent J. Gillespie, 61, of Athol, Massachusetts, was sentenced to 68 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay a combined $27,000 for a number of offenses, including assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers.
    • Logan James Barnhart, 41, of Holt, Michigan, was sentenced to 36 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay a combined $5,688 after pleading guilty to assaulting an officer.
    • Robert Wayne Dennis, 63, of Garland, Texas, was sentenced to 36 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 after being found guilty of a number of charges, including two counts of assaulting, resisting or impeding officers.
    • Howard Berton Adams, 62, of Edgewater, Florida, was sentenced to eight months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay a combined $4,000 for interfering with law enforcement officers during a civil disorder.
     
  19. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    • Josiah Kenyon, 35, of Winnemucca, Nevada, was sentenced to 72 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and was ordered to pay $43,315.25 after pleading guilty to two felonies: assaulting a law enforcement officer with a dangerous weapon and assaulting a law enforcement officer with a dangerous weapon resulting in bodily injury.
    • Robert Sanford, Jr., 57, a retired firefighter from Chester, Pennsylvania, was sentenced to 52 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release, and ordered to pay a combined $5,798 after pleading guilty to injuring an officer with a dangerous weapon after he threw a fire extinguisher, hitting three officers.
    • Shawn Price, 28, of Rockaway Township, New Jersey, the leader of the state's Proud Boys chapter, was sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to interfering with law enforcement officers during a civil disorder.
    • Riley June Williams, 23, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, was sentenced to 36 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 for charges that included interfering with law enforcement officers during a civil disorder.
    • Geoffrey Samuel Shough, 38, of Austin, Texas, was sentenced to six months in prison, 12 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to interfering with a law enforcement officer during a civil disorder.
    • Anthony Puma, 50, of Brownstown, Michigan was sentenced to nine months in prison, two years of supervised release and ordered to pay a combined $2,500 after pleading guilty to obstruction of an official proceeding.
    • Geoffrey William Sills, 31, of Mechanicsville, Virginia, was sentenced to 52 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,000 for charges that included assaulting an officer.
    • Aiden Henry Bilyard, 20, of Cary, North Carolina, was sentenced to 40 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $3,500 after pleading guilty to assaulting MPD officers using a dangerous weapon.
    • Mitchell Todd Gardner II, 34, of Seffner, Florida, was sentenced to 55 months in prison, 36 months of supervised release and ordered to pay $3,500 after pleading guilty to a number of charges, including assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers with a dangerous weapon.
    • Larry Rendall Brock, 55, of Grapevine, Texas, was sentenced to 24 months in prison for the felony of obstruction of an official proceeding. He was sentenced to a total of 18 months of concurrent prison time for five misdemeanors, as well as being ordered to pay $2,000.
    • Daniel Egtvedt, 59, of Oakland, Maryland, was sentenced to 42 months in prison for four felony charges and three misdemeanors, including assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers, and ordered to pay $2,000 and serve three years on supervised release, after being forcibly removed from the Capitol.
    • John Thomas Gordon, 47, of Davis, West Virginia, was sentenced to six months in prison, 24 months of supervised release—the first six months in home confinement—and ordered to pay $2,000 after pleading guilty to interfering with law enforcement officers during a civil disorder.
    • Tristan Chandler Stevens, 27, of Pensacola, Florida, was sentenced to 60 months in prison, 24 months of supervised release and ordered to pay a combined $2,500, on various counts, including four of assaulting or aiding and abetting in assaulting law enforcement officers.
    • William Wright Watson, 25, of Auburn, Alabama, was sentenced to 36 months in prison and 36 months of supervised release for charges that included obstruction of an official proceeding.
     
  20. Rashmon

    Rashmon Contributing Member

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    I fell like I'm posting from the k9texan school of spamalot...
     
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