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Monkeypox outbreak

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by Ottomaton, May 22, 2022.

  1. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Contributing Member

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    So you're telling me the gay parents are getting a pass?

    Shiiieeet, too early in the morning for me to brood on that.
     
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  2. Ottomaton

    Ottomaton Contributing Member
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  3. JuanValdez

    JuanValdez Contributing Member

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    I understand its a public health threat. But it really isn't much of a personal threat. So it's pretty hard for me to really put much focus on it.

    It is not only contracted through gay male sex. It can be contracted through intimate contact, like snuggling. I don't know if you're a parent, but I can tell you there's plenty of intimate (non-sexual) contact with young kids. I think it's totally unsurprising that a young child would get it from an infected parent.
     
  4. txtony

    txtony Member

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    Or simply like the cold. Droplets that pick up from a table or chair.

    I can't believe Commodore went there though... hopefully, it's just some ignorance.
     
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  5. TheFreak

    TheFreak Contributing Member

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    Imagine how much harder it will be to contain diseases like this after the GOP outlaws condoms.
     
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  6. MojoMan

    MojoMan Member

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    So, what are you guys wanting to advocate for here as a response?

    Let me guess: A hysterical corporate media panic promotion campaign, together with a CDC endorsed agenda for mandatory masking, mandatory inoculations, social distancing, school shutdowns, and maybe full lockdowns as well. And all that ramping up in advance of the election in November.

    Amiright?
     
  7. txtony

    txtony Member

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    There is probably inadequate testing to see a clear picture of what's going on. I would even say we are somewhat blind. I want to see the CDC working to make testing available easier and encourage its use (let it be free). The good news is we have tests for monkeypox - we just need to streamline it.

    Another good news is we have vax. We need to be prepared for a bigger outbreak - prepare for something bad and hope to never use it. So far, that seems to be ok - https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2022...nneos-vaccine-for-monkeypox-preparedness.html

    As for media panic promotion - I'm not seeing any of that (caveat - I don't watch any cable news) and hope to not see it.
     
  8. VooDooPope

    VooDooPope Love > Hate
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    WOW the GOP really has become the party of the ignorant and the willfully ignorant.

    A party built of hatred, fear and lies.
     
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  9. jiggyfly

    jiggyfly Member
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    Are you really that surprised?

    It's very on brand for Commodore.
     
  10. SuraGotMadHops

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    From an infected GAY parent.

    Again, why isn't the CDC lecturing homosexuals to absain from buttsex to slow the spread? Should only take two weeks. It's for the greater good.
     
  11. ROCKSS

    ROCKSS Contributing Member

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    Commy gotta commy.............in the same vein that Matt Gaetz says large woman wanting an abortion is a joke cause no one wants to get them pregnant, he doesn't even try and hide his trumpisms, he came out today and said if you don't like it then be offended, that's your cray cray new far right type gop............talk about driving a wedge between Americans
     
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  12. CCorn

    CCorn Member

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    AroundTheWorld and Invisible Fan like this.
  13. tinman

    tinman Contributing Member
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  14. txtony

    txtony Member

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    As monkeypox spreads, so do concerns about stigma : NPR

    When the World Health Organization declared monkeypox a public health emergency over the weekend, it also warned of another threat to society:

    "Stigma and discrimination can be as dangerous as any virus," said WHO Director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

    In fact, the WHO emergency committee that had previously considered whether to issue such a declaration was unable to reach a consensus in part because of concerns about the risk of stigma, marginalization and discrimination against the communities hit hardest by the virus.

    The global monkeypox outbreak appears to mostly affect men who have sex with other men. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that 98% of people diagnosed with the virus between April and June in more than a dozen countries identify as gay or bisexual men, and the WHO says that 99% of U.S. cases are related to male-to-male sexual contact.

    That means that the public health systems can target their messaging and interventions to the specific communities most at risk. But it also carries the risk of stigmatizing those populations, while sowing complacency in others that could still be vulnerable.

    Public health experts stress that monkeypox is relevant to everyone, since it can spread through skin-to-skin contact and potentially contaminated objects like clothing or towels. And viruses can infect anyone. The U.S. has already documented two cases of monkeypox in children, for example.

    "While we may be seeing clusters primarily in certain groups of people, viruses do not discriminate by race, by religion, or by sexual orientation," infectious disease researcher Dr. Boghuma Titanji told NPR.

    How exactly can leaders educate people about monkeypox without stigmatizing those who are most likely to be affected by it?

    At a Tuesday briefing, White House adviser Dr. Ashish Jha urged people not to "use this moment to propagate homophobic or transphobic messaging," instead encouraging them to stick to evidence and facts, and to do so respectfully.

    Steven Thrasher, a writer and professor at Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism, says part of the solution is having adequate resources in place for testing, vaccinating and supporting people when they're diagnosed (the U.S. has been criticized for its limited supply of vaccines, but is expected to make more available in the coming weeks). Another part is tackling homophobia itself.

    "Because as long as there is a homophobic society and people are afraid of what it means to come forward, that this thing will make people think that they're gay, then they're not going to want to come forward," Thrasher told NPR last month. "And there's no easy fix for that. That's a long-term problem that needs long-term thinking to undo and make different."

    How to think about risks and be proactive
    The monkeypox virus is similar to smallpox and endemic to Africa — nearly all cases previously found outside the continent were tied to international travel and imported animals. What's different now is how well it spreads through intimate person-to-person contact, says Jason Cianciotto, a vice president of Gay Men's Health Crisis.

    "But it doesn't necessarily have to be sexual: cuddling, massage, sharing bedding or towels that have come in contact with pustules," he told NPR's Weekend Edition. "Even if you're fully clothed, if you're on the dance floor or dancing close to someone, there is the possibility of transmission."

    Dr. Ali Khan, a former official of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who worked on previous monkeypox outbreaks in Indiana and the Democratic Republic of Congo, says about 95% of infections are transmitted by sexual contact.

    He tells Morning Edition that the fact that the outbreak is most concentrated among men who have sex with men provides a good opportunity for prevention activities within this group, which has been proactive about getting information and lining up for vaccinations.

    "But there is the reminder that people who are not amongst this group are at risk, and we need to be concerned — not panicked, but concerned — and make sure that we do adequately prevent this infection from continuing to spread," he says. Khan added that public health data plays a crucial role in identifying cases, treating individuals, vaccinating close contacts and slowing the spread.

    There were 3,487 confirmed cases reported in the U.S. as of Monday. And as Cianciotto notes, a rise in cases doesn't just mean that more people are at risk — it could mean that more vulnerable people are at risk.

    "I'm really concerned that if the monkeypox outbreak goes unchecked, that it, too, will concentrate among low-income communities of color where HIV and COVID-19 is concentrating among immigrants, particularly those undocumented who are afraid to access health care," he said. "And that would be a tragedy."

    Why stigma is dangerous, and how to combat it
    Titanji, the clinical researcher, says it's dangerous for public health messaging to falsely suggest that monkeypox is not an issue of concern to anyone other than men who have sex with men.

    That's in part because it breeds stigma, which could prevent infected people from coming forward, seeking care and alerting their close contacts.

    "When we are trying to contain an outbreak, what we want ... is people to seek medical care when they see suspected lesions, so that they can be tested and be offered the treatment they need," she says.

    She adds that most people won't need to be hospitalized for treatment, since many tend to recover with supportive care, hydration and isolation. (The CDC says more than 99% of patients can expect to survive, though some researchers worry monkeypox could mutate and become more dangerous).

    Failure to address stigma early on can also create a sense of complacency in other segments of the population who may not otherwise be paying attention to the public health emergency, Titanji adds.

    She says it's important for public health officials to act early, and offer messaging that is not only clear but can also earn and restore the public's trust. For her personally, that involves sticking to facts, acknowledging unknowns and being clear that information may change as the science evolves.

    ...

    "We are not going to end HIV, and we're certainly not going to curtail the monkeypox epidemic, by trying to shame people into not having sex or only having certain types of sex with certain people," he adds. "When you equip people with the information they need to make healthy choices for themselves and for their community, and when you help them approach those decisions with self-love and acceptance, it's amazing what the community is able to achieve."
     
  15. J.R.

    J.R. Contributing Member

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    “ItS nOt A GaY dIsEaSe”

    99% of cases are gay men or “men who ****ed other men”

    10+ sex partners in the last 3 months…like holy ****.
    [​IMG]

    “It won’t do any good to tell them to stop sticking their dick in random strangers…or to stop guzzling another man’s piss and c*m…or stop gay orgies…”

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (Entire thread https://archive.ph/yAr8H)
    [​IMG]

    Remember, “not a gay disease” but only gay butt ****ers are eligible.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    #35 J.R., Jul 26, 2022
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2022
  16. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Contributing Member

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    I don't think saying it should be a credible threat beyond homosexuals is the same message as denying it's a gay disease. It's like HIV where people brushed it off as a gay disease only for it to spread.

    I guess we need another Magic moment where someone like Lebron gets monkey pox for people to pay attention and figure out wtf we can do to reduce the spread and inform the hardest hit communities.

    BTW, STIs are up for everyone.
    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/sti-rates-summer-sex-pandemic-125628250.html
     
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  17. KingCheetah

    KingCheetah Contributing Member

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    Bros need to chill for a minute.
     
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  18. deb4rockets

    deb4rockets Contributing Member

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    You could probably say that about a lot of NBA and NFL players, musicians, strip club frequenters, club hoppers, and frat boys as well. The only difference is their sexual orientation.
     
    jiggyfly likes this.
  19. ROCKSS

    ROCKSS Contributing Member

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    Haven't we learned from horrible diseases that the information at the start of a new virus can be wrong, they are just learning about this so who knows what they will eventually uncover. At first, HIV was only considered a gay disease and then we realized that anyone could get it but the stigma of the disease stuck. When Covid first started we didn't think we needed masks, well, they got more information and then they realized we did.....things change and diseases like this are new so they don't know everything yet, you have to be able to adapt and change as the scientific community learns more. I hope we learned from HIV to not stereotype a disease, hell by next week they might find out more and change the whole paradox.
     
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  20. superfob

    superfob Mommy WOW! I'm a Big Kid now.

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    [​IMG]
     
    Invisible Fan, ROCKSS and deb4rockets like this.

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