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What's wrong with Rox medical team?

Discussion in 'Houston Rockets: Game Action & Roster Moves' started by wolverinemich, Feb 26, 2008.

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  1. wolverinemich

    wolverinemich Member

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    If you can not prevent/diagnose/protect your franchise player, you should be punished one million times!


    The current medical team should be disbanded immediately.

    Stress Fracture
    From Jonathan Cluett, M.D.,
    Your Guide to Orthopedics.
    FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!
    About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by Kate Grossman, MD
    \What is a stress fracture?
    A stress fracture is a common overuse injury most often seen in athletes. Usually, a fracture, or broken bone, is caused by an acute event, such as a car crash or a fall. When this is the case, the bone experiences a very high force that causes the stress fracture.

    A stress fracture occurs when the forces are much lower, but happen repetitively for a long period of time; these injuries are also known as "fatigue fractures." Stress fractures are commonly seen in athletes who run and jump on hard surfaces, such as distance runners, basketball players, and ballet dancers.

    A stress fracture can occur in any bone, but is commonly seen in the foot and shin bones. They rarely occur in the upper extremity because the weight of your body is not supported by your arms as it is in your legs.

    How is a stress fracture diagnosed?
    Physical examination and history are important in diagnosing stress fractures. Because these overuse injuries have a typical course and common physical findings, the history and examination can be critical in the diagnostic evaluation. X-Rays usually do not show a stress fracture, but they may show evidence of bone attempting to heal around the stress fracture. Further studies, including an MRI or bone scan may be necessary if the diagnosis is unclear or if the problem does not resolve with treatment.

    Why did I get a stress fracture?
    Bone is constantly undergoing changes to adapt to its environment. When astronauts go into space, they are known to develop a thinning of the bone similar to osteoporosis. The reason is that their skeleton is not under the constant demands of gravity, and the bone adapts to that environment. Stress fractures are usually seen in athletes who increase their level of activity over a short period of time. The increased demand placed on the bone causes the bone to remodel and become stronger in the areas of higher stress. However, if the response of the bone cannot maintain the pace of the repetitive demands, a stress fracture may result.

    Another factor that can contribute to the development of a stress fracture are dietary abnormalities and menstrual irregularities. Because both factors contribute to bone health, any problems with diet (e.g. poor nutrition, anorexia, bulimia) or menstruation (amenorrhea) may place an individual at higher risk for these injuries. This is one reason that adolescent female athletes are at particularly high risk for development of a stress fracture.

    What is the treatment for a stress fracture?
    The best treatment is almost always resting the injured leg. If there is no evidence that the stress fracture may displace, then avoiding the overuse activity may be sufficient treatment. However, if there is a concern of displacement of the stress fracture, then weight-bearing should be avoided (i.e. use crutches), and a cast may be placed. One rule of thumb (but not an absolute rule) is: if there is pain, don't do it. This means if jogging causes pain where you have a stress fracture, don't jog. If walking causes pain in that location, use crutches.

    Other general stress fracture treatment principles include:

    * Ice the injured area
    * Wear proper equipment, specifically footwear
    * Increase activities gradually
    * If pain develops and persists, seek medical advice
     
  2. texanskan

    texanskan Contributing Member

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    Nothing

    Yao = Bill Walton
     
  3. dntrwl

    dntrwl Member

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    keith jones is one of the best trainers in the league and we should be happy to have him this long..
     
  4. landryfans

    landryfans Member

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    was it 9 games? ago vs Bucks? Yi land on Yao's foot?
     
  5. TrailerMonkey

    TrailerMonkey Member

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    Yeah, it's pretty incredible that our Franchise player has been complaing about a sore foot for 3 frickin' weeks yet none of the medical staff could do anything other than ice it!!??!?! I have to 2nd the notion that the entire medical staff, sans Keith Jones, should be canned immediately. This is ridiculous.
     
  6. caneks

    caneks Rookie

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    Yap, T-Mac, and now Yao. Two big mistakes in a season already.
     
  7. emjohn

    emjohn Contributing Member

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    WTF do you expect them to do? Give him a $3 thousand MR once a week on each foot just to double check? Cause that's the only way to know for sure.

    This is a direct result of putting 300+ pounds on top of 5-foot legs and jumping on them. It's almost inevitable for guys with this kind of body type to have foot and joint issues. Look at Ralph Sampson.

    The other issue is China making sure his body gets overworked year round. You can bet your last dollar that they'll force him to play this summer even if he isn't fully healed yet.

    Evan
     
  8. SWTsig

    SWTsig Contributing Member

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    you guys are idiots.
     
  9. Zboy

    Zboy Contributing Member

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    Cant jog and yet he played in NBA games for weeks. Unfrigginbelievable. With all that weight he probably damaged it further and complicated matters.

    Looks like the medical staff treated it as a minor ankle sprain and never even bothered to diagnose it properly. Because the pain persisted for several weeks, they finally decided to run full tests on it.

    What an embarrassment. I would be looking to crawl under a hole if I were on Rockets medical staff.
     
  10. rocketsmetalspd

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    It is begining to look like but I am hopefull he will not end up like Bill.
     
  11. wakkoman

    wakkoman Contributing Member

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    ... Because you know everything that the medical staff did to try and prevent this ... :rolleyes:

    Get some facts before you start throwing people under the bus
     
  12. popear

    popear Member

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    I agree. The rockets medical team should do a better job!

    Yeah Yao and TMAC are both "injury-prone", but let's say, an "injury-prone" car in the hands of a good mechanic who knows how to take care of it, versus a normal car that never gets the oil changed...not a good metaphor but guess you got the point!
     
  13. rocketsmetalspd

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    YOUR FIRED!!!! Damn it!!
     
  14. Deuce

    Deuce Context & Nuance

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    That's scary but unfortunately, it's true. No way China doesn't rush Yao back to play in the Olympics.
     
  15. bigben333

    bigben333 Member

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    this medical staff sucks .

    it's 2 late to discover this.
     
  16. Bandwagoner

    Bandwagoner Contributing Member

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    Ok.

    I mean the foot is worth about 40 million (remaining contract) so 3 thousand per week over 6 months would be .1% of the value
     
  17. LegendZ3

    LegendZ3 Contributing Member

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    I would think if your #1 player who earn you millions a year is complaining about a sore foot, an $3000 MRI isn't really that much to spend.
     
  18. Apollo Creed

    Apollo Creed Contributing Member

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    Why is he the best? Because he's a snappy dresser and the players seem to like him?

    We've been injury plagued during his entire freaking tenure with the team.
     
  19. t_mac1

    t_mac1 Contributing Member

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    exactly.

    tmac's knee wasn't properly diagnosed and tmac himself hinted that it was serious b/c he didn't want to take an MRI. keith jones said it wans't necessary. when they did have one, they saw that it was serious.

    now this after saying it is minor last night.

    get the eff outta here
     
  20. TrailerMonkey

    TrailerMonkey Member

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    Actually, that IS too much according to certain posters here. Better off saving that 3000/week and have a ballboy look at Yao's sore foot/ankle. It certainly won't come back to bite the Rockets in the ass right? Oh wait....
     
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