Vince charging for an autograph? Oh the shame!

Discussion in 'Football: NFL, College, High School' started by Icehouse, Jan 19, 2006.

  1. Icehouse

    Icehouse Contributing Member

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    There are SO MANY Vince Young threads, and I didn't feel like looking through all of them to see if this was posted.

    Here is Justice's take on Vince being in a signing show this Sunday. I don't have a problem with him charging for his signature, as I will be getting a jersey signed ($99) and putting it on e-bay.

    http://blogs.chron.com/sportsjustice/archives/2006/01/vince_charging.html

    Vince charging for an autograph? Oh the shame!
    If you want Vince Young's autograph this weekend, you're going to pay. You're going to pay to get an autograph from Brad Lidge, Roy Oswalt, Wade Boggs and dozens of others, too.

    But it's Vince Young charging for an autograph that seems to have gotten people's attention. Some of you believe your hero has turned into another money-grubbing athlete.

    He's charging between $79 and $99 for a signature at this weekend's Tristar Collectibles Show at the George R. Brown Convention Center.

    He's charging more for a photo-op, but those are sold out.

    (I'm told neither he nor the other players set the prices.)

    He's not the highest-priced guy there. Wade Boggs will cost you between $79 and $129; Barry Sanders between $129 and $149; Roy Oswalt between $59 and $99.

    There are free autographs: Troy Patton, Koby Clemens, Josh Barfield.

    Before judging these guys, wait a couple of weeks and see how many of those Vince Young autographs are for sale on eBay. It won't be a small number.

    And this is the way athletes see it.

    They believe this is business. There's signing for little Johnny after batting practice. That's one thing. And then there are these massive shows, in which (they believe) a huge number of autographs are being resold for profit. So why shouldn't they profit?

    This is a complicated issue. Most of these athletes - Young included - have signed hundreds of autographs for free. I've seen Young do it after countless UT games.

    Does that make charging for an autograph right? We all have different views.

    If you go to Cooperstown, N.Y., on induction weekend, you'll see retired players lined up on both sides of the street charging for autographs. When players aren't charging, people will ask them to sign three pieces of something and not personalize it. That tells the player the item will be on eBay within 24 hours.

    Cal Ripken had another solution: he signed so many autographs that he hoped his signature would have little value. He signed for 30 minutes a day, at least.

    (I've heard one late Hall of Famer who was signing memorbilia up until the final days of his life at the insistence of his kids. This wasn't for little Johnny down the street, either. He knew his final signatures would become a valuable part of his estate.) Funny story. One year in Cooperstown, people were lined up in the rain to get Pete Rose's autograph. Pete signs balls for $10, small pictures for $12, large pictures for $50, etc. If you don't have something for him to sign, he'll sell you a ball or a picture.

    He has made big money doing this. It may be his chief source of income.

    I watched this scene in Cooperstown for awhile (Pete is also talking to me and another sportswriter while signing AND chatting up the people he's signing for--he's amazing in the area of customer relations) and I call up a columnist from Cincinnati. I tell him he has to walk over and check out the scene around Pete.

    He comes over, surveys the area and says: ''My only surprise is that I assumed everyone in America who wanted Pete's autograph already had it.''

    I'll bet Pete--OK, bet is the wrong word--is somewhere this weekend charging money for his autograph.

    On the Tristar web site, there are upcoming events in which you can have a video made of yourself and, say, Pete Rose. A real personal moment.

    I get countless notes from people who complain about the Astros or Rockets not being available to sign autographs enough. I'm always told of players treating someone badly.

    In defense of them -- and this is weak -- they're asked constantly for their autographs. They, like you or me, get tired of it. They know (I think they do) that signing autographs is part of the job. They understand meals are going to be interrupted at times.

    The huge majority are happy to do this. They understand the perks of the job far outweigh the negatives. Some behave like jerks.

    I'm sure Young, now being flooded with financial opportunities, was told: ``Come here, sign for a few hours with Roy Oswalt, Brad Lidge, etc., and you'll make a bundle.'' He decided that sounded like a pretty good deal. I've personally never understood the whole memorbilia craze, but I also see how it's big business. On both sides.

    In case you're interested, Roger Clemens will be appearing Feb. 4. In Las Vegas. It won't be cheap.
     
  2. RocketMan Tex

    RocketMan Tex Contributing Member

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    Sign of the times :(
     
  3. gucci888

    gucci888 Contributing Member

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    I can't wait to get my Koby Clemens autograph!!

    Does it say where the money is going to? I don't see players like Oswalt, Lidge, Sanders needing money that bad.
     
  4. IC2000

    IC2000 Contributing Member

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    It goes straight to their pockets and to the promoters Tri Star. Tri star pays the athletes, and then they charge more so they profit.

    I got Vince to sign two things last week and am selling them on EBAY. Thanks Vince, your not that bad after all.
     
  5. pradaxpimp

    pradaxpimp Contributing Member

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    No offense to the homosexuals, but thats what i call GAY
     
  6. JuanValdez

    JuanValdez Contributing Member

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    Why do they have to do the shows at all?
     
  7. RocketMan Tex

    RocketMan Tex Contributing Member

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    To make even more money.
     
  8. bejezuz

    bejezuz Contributing Member

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    Good for Vince. He played at UT 4 years for free (don't forget redshirt), that's enough freebies for anybody. I just hope he's got a good investment team.

    Don't get me started on how student atheletes should be payed more money. Even freshman undergrad assistants at UT get payed over 6 bucks an hour.
     
  9. Baqui99

    Baqui99 Contributing Member

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    TriStar shows are mostly for memorabilia resellers and avid collectors, as opposed to the common fan. That is why they charge a premium for autographs, as they're in the business of making money. Meanwhile, because Vince is arguably the most popular athlete in the nation right now, TriStar can charge a premium for his autograph.

    As far as anyone questioning Vince's sincerity, after road games, Vince regularly hangs around outside the locker to sign autographs for kids. I saw this firsthand after the Texas A&M game at Kyle Fied. The buses waited for him to finish signing before heading back to Austin.
     
  10. Hakeem06

    Hakeem06 Member

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    before everyone goes off on vince young for charging for autographs, as a collector of the sports hobby industry (cards, autographs, and jerseys). when athletes GO to these shows THEY ALL CHARGE for autographs, EVERY SINGLE one of them. that's how the people who put it on get their money. the athletes don't keep all of that money. more than half of it goes to the company putting on the show. i'm sure if you met vince or any of these other athletes in person, they'd shake your hand and give you an autograph for FREE. it's just that these shows are used for company's to make money. so they offer these guys part of the fee that they charge the showgoers, for themselves.
     
  11. underoverup

    underoverup Member

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    This thread belongs in the Texan forum.

    ;)
     
  12. Cohen

    Cohen Contributing Member

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    (Heh...ironic that you're making money off Vince)


    This is exactly why I have no problem with Vince getting paid. If it doesn't go into his pocket, that $ will often into the pocket of someone who's done nothing to deserve it other than getting his signature then listing it on ebay. (no offense)
     
  13. IC2000

    IC2000 Contributing Member

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    "getting his signature" is a lot more work than you realize but the point is valid
     
  14. rusHour

    rusHour Contributing Member

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    I actaully have his signature...on reciept paper..but hey its something.

    There is a resturant my GF used to work at as a bartender, and he goes in to eat from time to time. He went in through mid season and I heard he went in again after they won the championship. Its too bad my GF left that job because I could of had another......

    Very surprising he went into a public resturant after winning the Rose Bowl. Friends said that everyone was all over him.

    and no Im not lieing.
     
  15. reggietodd

    reggietodd Contributing Member

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    I don't have a problem with this. Since it all ends up on ebay and for sale anyways, I don't have a problem with athletes charging for an autograph.
     
  16. Asian Sensation

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    As a kid I always thought autographs were really special but as I get older I don't see what the big deal is. It's just a name that's signed.
     
  17. KaiSeR SoZe

    KaiSeR SoZe Contributing Member

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    For me an autograph is just proof of me meeting someone famous but i wouldn't buy it unless i collected that stuff
     
  18. gucci888

    gucci888 Contributing Member

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    I remember long long ago that I saw Penny Hardaway at D&B in Houston, I was probably like 10 years old maybe. Anyways I asked for his autograph and he said he couldn't give me one because he can only sign some brand of basketball cards.

    That's 10 times worst in my opinion.
     
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