1. Welcome! Please take a few seconds to create your free account to post threads, make some friends, remove a few ads while surfing and much more. ClutchFans has been bringing fans together to talk Houston Sports since 1996. Join us!

HISD proposes $1.9 billion bond to upgrade high schools

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by Icehouse, Jun 21, 2012.

  1. Icehouse

    Icehouse Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2000
    Messages:
    11,512
    Likes Received:
    1,325
    I would vote for it.

     
  2. Classic

    Classic Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2007
    Messages:
    6,098
    Likes Received:
    597
    One of the projects with this is a total swap of the HVAC systems in favor of more efficient systems. The load this would take off the local power grid is supposed to be quite a bit. Great use of tax payer dollars that would allow contractors a 'stimulus' of sort to fix & update the aging infrastructure. Good project all around that would put a lot of people to work.
     
  3. RedRedemption

    RedRedemption Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Messages:
    30,927
    Likes Received:
    5,280
    Inb4 Hightop DESTROY GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS!
    LIBERAL DEVILS!
     
  4. DaDakota

    DaDakota Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 1999
    Messages:
    106,816
    Likes Received:
    9,852
    How about a pool of money to give bonuses to the best teachers?

    DD
     
  5. tallanvor

    tallanvor Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    Messages:
    14,139
    Likes Received:
    3,627
    Unions would never allow this. Ever.

     
    #5 tallanvor, Jun 21, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2012
  6. FranchiseBlade

    FranchiseBlade Contributing Member
    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Messages:
    39,964
    Likes Received:
    5,600
    spoken by someone who doesn't have a clue what he's talking about.

    If the only way to judge is based on test scores then it's faulty, encourages teaching to the test, cheating etc. In addition some tests are not created equally across the board. If a student in 4th grade takes a test designed at the 4th grade level, then when that same student gets to 5th grade and thanks to a design flaw the test there is created at a 6th grade level, scores will almost always go down. This also encourages the best teachers to leave schools where students need the most help because if they teach at already high achieving schools the kids will be more likely to perform well on their tests and earn the bonuses.

    The Union will never agree to bonuses under that kind of criteria. However the union in Los Angeles is currently working on a way to do evaluations where student test scores are a part of the evaluation, but not the total of the evaluation. So the Union is actually working on a way that would allow bonuses for student acheivement.
     
    #6 FranchiseBlade, Jun 21, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2012
  7. tallanvor

    tallanvor Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    Messages:
    14,139
    Likes Received:
    3,627
  8. DaDakota

    DaDakota Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 1999
    Messages:
    106,816
    Likes Received:
    9,852
    I hate that crap, then make it a school wide bonus for brining up the overall school situation....and every teacher gets a bump.

    DD
     
  9. FranchiseBlade

    FranchiseBlade Contributing Member
    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Messages:
    39,964
    Likes Received:
    5,600
    I edited my post after tal edited his. What you've said is a good idea, but there should be a way to hold teachers accountable as well. It's important.

    I like your idea of the whole school going up, then all teachers get a bonus. That will help teachers who teach grades like Kinder that don't take the standardized tests. Otherwise they don't have a chance at earning bonuses. Your idea also would encourage teachers working together and help attract teachers to low performing schools in order to have a greater opportunity for improvement.
     
  10. HombreDeHierro

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,328
    Likes Received:
    42
    is anyone else noticing something weird?

    "HISD’s last bond issue, for $805 million in 2002, passed by only 51 percent of the vote. It was firmly opposed strongly by leaders of the black community."


    dafuq? Why would they oppose something that helps their own community?
     
  11. tallanvor

    tallanvor Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    Messages:
    14,139
    Likes Received:
    3,627
    That money comes from somewhere.
     
  12. bigtexxx

    bigtexxx Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2002
    Messages:
    26,111
    Likes Received:
    1,791
    It's a lot of money for a lot of people
     
  13. JunkyardDwg

    JunkyardDwg Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2000
    Messages:
    8,522
    Likes Received:
    419
    Under the Aspire (HISD) program, teachers and staff from high performing schools or schools that show the most gain in student achievement do recieve bonuses based on school wide success. The difference is that the non-core teachers have a ceiling as to how much bonus pay they can receive, while the core teachers can earn several thousand more. But the whole faculty does earn something.

    The problem is that merit pay is tied exclusively to standardized tests.

    It is interesting that tax hikes were and are off the table when it comes to saving teacher's jobs, but now they are not. Schools in Houston definitely need upgrade, but perhaps this plan is a bit too ambitious given the economic uncertainty of the times.
     
  14. diogenes

    diogenes Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2002
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    3
    Being an engineering consultant specifically in the education market this is good news. If it passes it would put a lot of people to work. If I'm not mistaken HISD requires all of their schools to be energy efficient LEED certified buildings. The down side is that I believe HISD requires the architects/engineers to be a minority owned firm which is a different argument.
     
  15. RedRedemption

    RedRedemption Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Messages:
    30,927
    Likes Received:
    5,280
    Education is always worth it.
     
  16. JD88

    JD88 Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    310
    This. Same thing in Louisville. A proposal to widen the criteria of evaluation in an attempt to give bonuses to the best performing teachers was shot down due to the teachers union.

    The argument is inner city schools, with inner city kids, would never have good teachers simply because they all move to where the kids are more dedicated to class work.
     
  17. DFWRocket

    DFWRocket Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2000
    Messages:
    3,752
    Likes Received:
    818
    yes and no.

    Currently in many places, schools in upper and upper-middle class neighborhoods pay teachers a lot less than schools in lower income areas. So if a teacher is interested in higher pay, they teach in lower-income areas..if they want work-satisfaction over pay..they work in higher income areas.

    It took my wife 15 years at her upper-middle class school to achieve the same income level teachers start at in other districts. But she has excellent parental support which translates to excellent student performance.
    Merit pay is horribly unfair because teachers in lower districts have a much harder job due to the lack of interest in parents & students.
     
  18. DaDakota

    DaDakota Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 1999
    Messages:
    106,816
    Likes Received:
    9,852
    I heard from one of the teachers in our district that 2/3rds of the staff in any district is administration, why is it not 2/3rds are teachers?

    DD
     
  19. Deckard

    Deckard Blade Runner
    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2002
    Messages:
    46,527
    Likes Received:
    14,039
    It's hard to get HISD bonds passed. The vast majority of White students go to some sort of private school. During the 2009-2010 school year, "White" students made up 7.8% of the student population. I didn't make that up. So there isn't a "dog in the hunt" for short-sighted White Houston voters (who are more likely to get out and vote, ordinarily), and HISD keeps spiraling down.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston_Independent_School_District

    During the 1990's, Houston voters defeated a $390 million dollar bond proposal, and HISD ended up farming out 250 students to 3 private schools for a while as a result (according to HISD). I'll be shocked if this passes. I hope it does, but I'm not optimistic.
     
  20. C-Mo

    C-Mo Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    150
    Likes Received:
    18
    I think HISD is just too big. If the district had fewer schools, one would think it could be more efficient in its use of funds. But instead HISD may get even bigger if they decide to merge North Forest ISD with them.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  • About ClutchFans

    Since 1996, ClutchFans has been loud and proud covering the Houston Rockets, helping set an industry standard for team fan sites. The forums have been a home for Houston sports fans as well as basketball fanatics around the globe.

  • Support ClutchFans!

    If you find that ClutchFans is a valuable resource for you, please consider becoming a Supporting Member. Supporting Members can upload photos and attachments directly to their posts, customize their user title and more. Gold Supporters see zero ads!


    Upgrade Now