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H-Town Info
11-08-2005, 01:21 PM
jw, does 100% non-concentrate oj contain added sugar. my friends thinks that gatorade is better for you since it doesnt have much sugar.

droxford
11-08-2005, 01:37 PM
jw, does 100% non-concentrate oj contain added sugar. my friends thinks that gatorade is better for you since it doesnt have much sugar.

I don't think so. But that just means that it doesn't have "added" sugar. Many foods (like fruits) are high in sugar by nature.

The Real Shady
11-08-2005, 01:39 PM
I thought Gatorade has a lot of suger in it.

A-Train
11-08-2005, 01:51 PM
The sugar molecules in fruit (which is also used to sweeten gatorade) is monosaccharide and is more easily broken down than disaccharides, which are used to sweeten soft drinks, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. If it's 100% natural, it should be OK...

MR. MEOWGI
11-08-2005, 01:55 PM
The sugar molecules in fruit (which is also used to sweeten gatorade) is monosaccharide and is more easily broken down than disaccharides, which are used to sweeten soft drinks, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. If it's 100% natural, it should be OK...

Why does 100% natural juice have corn syrup in it? Or does it?

droxford
11-08-2005, 01:56 PM
Why does 100% natural juice have corn syrup in it? Or does it?

I would think that since corn syrup comes from corn, they may be able to away with putting it in there.

A-Train
11-08-2005, 01:58 PM
Why does 100% natural juice have corn syrup in it? Or does it?

I guess "100% natural" was a bad choice of words, since corn syrup is derived from nature. If it says "100% juice" and there is corn syrup or any other sweetener added, then it's illegal to put 100% juice on there...

droxford
11-08-2005, 02:04 PM
I guess "100% natural" was a bad choice of words, since corn syrup is derived from nature. If it says "100% juice" and there is corn syrup or any other sweetener added, then it's illegal to put 100% juice on there...

Yes, but be careful to make sure you buy the kind that's labeled "100% fruit juice" as opposed to "100% juice", 'cause that other stuff may have man-juice in it.

The Real Shady
11-08-2005, 02:06 PM
This is a very interesting thread. ;)

Xerobull
11-08-2005, 02:18 PM
When I was around four years old, I thought that 'From Concentrate' meant that Walter Conkrite made the O.J.

PhiSlammaJamma
11-08-2005, 02:35 PM
This reminds me, when maple syrup comes out of a tree it looks just like water. Same consistency too. You can actually tap into it pretty easily. Saw that on the Globe Trekker. Pretty suprising to me.

apostolic3
11-08-2005, 02:45 PM
I'm going to bust a myth: Fruit juice (including "fresh squeezed") is not that good for you. Orange juice, apple juice, etc isn't much more than sugar water fortified with Vitamin C. Look at the nutrition labels and you will see what I'm talking about.

If you want the full nutritional benefits of fruit, eat the whole fruit, which includes the skin and pulp. These have the fiber and anti-oxidents. Before someone starts joking, of course you don't eat the skin from an orange. The membranes that section off the inside contain the good stuff.

To burst the bubble even more: Juicing vegetables is also a big mistake for the same reason. If you insist on liquifying, pulverize fruit and veggies instead of squeezing the juice out. You keep all of the nutrition benefits this way.

For the record, most orange juice you buy does not have added sugar. It has more than enough on it's own. Adding sugar to orange juice is like adding sugar to Kellogg's Frosted Flakes.

Personally, I recommend Gatorade over orange juice. It has fewer calories because it has much less sugar.

Because of tradition and conventional wisdom, some of you think I'm way off base. Ask a nutritionist or dietician. It will surprise you.

PhiSlammaJamma
11-08-2005, 02:51 PM
I just looked at my Topicana Peach Papaya drink. Apparently you need the word REAL Fruit Juice as well. It also says that it contains 5% juice. Which makes you wonder. I probably have a mixture of FAKE juice and REAL Juice. At exactly what percentages I have no idea.

droxford
11-08-2005, 02:55 PM
I just looked at my Topicana Peach Papaya drink. Apparently you need the word REAL Fruit Juice as well. It also says that it contains 5% juice. Which makes you wonder. I probably have a mixture of FAKE juice and REAL Juice. At exactly what percentages I have no idea.

"Topicana Peach Papaya drink" means absolutely nothing. It doesn't have to have peach or papaya in it. It doesn't even have to taste like peach or papaya. when they add that word "drink" at the end, all bets are off. You're drinking kool-aid.

(ever notice that Grape-Nuts has neither grapes nor nuts in it?)

A-Train
11-08-2005, 02:59 PM
I'm going to bust a myth: Fruit juice (including "fresh squeezed") is not that good for you. Orange juice, apple juice, etc isn't much more than sugar water fortified with Vitamin C.

If it has vitamin C, it CAN'T be good for you...

I'm sure the juiceman could STILL kick your ass, though!

http://marcelphotography.net/uploads/Jay%20Kordich%20Web%20sharp.jpg

A-Train
11-08-2005, 03:30 PM
Oh, and FYI, per 8 oz serving, OJ has 110 calories, 480 mg of potassium, 3 grams of fiber, 100% daily value of vitamin C, 2% daily value of calcium, plus thiamine, niacin, B6, and folate. Plus, OJ doesn't have any sodium. Gatorade only has 50 calories, but it only has 30 mg of potassium, no fiber, and 110 mg of sodium, plus none of the other nutrients.

How exactly is Gatorade better for you than fruit juice? Gatorade is basically salt water that's intended to re-hydrate you after strenuous physical activity. Neither gatorade nor fruit juice was intented to be a replacement for natural water. The sugar in fruit (and gatorade, for that matter) is NOT the same sugar that goes into sodas and desserts.

Would I drink nothing but fruit juice? No...However, to say that gatorade is better for you than fruit juice because it has less sugar is absurd, and any doctor or nutritionist that tells you this probably got their degree by mailing in four cereal box tops with $2.99 shipping and handling...

mulletman
11-08-2005, 03:55 PM
Personally, I recommend Gatorade over orange juice. It has fewer calories because it has much less sugar..

but unfortunately (at least according to this site), sports drinks like gatorade are really bad for your teeth...

enamel damage caused by non-cola and sports beverages was three to 11 times greater than cola-based drinks, with energy drinks and bottled lemonades causing the most

link (http://www.dentalgentlecare.com/diet_soda.htm#Sports_drinks)

apostolic3
11-08-2005, 04:11 PM
Oh, and FYI, per 8 oz serving, OJ has 110 calories, 480 mg of potassium, 3 grams of fiber, 100% daily value of vitamin C, 2% daily value of calcium, plus thiamine, niacin, B6, and folate. Plus, OJ doesn't have any sodium. Gatorade only has 50 calories, but it only has 30 mg of potassium, no fiber, and 110 mg of sodium, plus none of the other nutrients.

How exactly is Gatorade better for you than fruit juice? Gatorade is basically salt water that's intended to re-hydrate you after strenuous physical activity. Neither gatorade nor fruit juice was intented to be a replacement for natural water. The sugar in fruit (and gatorade, for that matter) is NOT the same sugar that goes into sodas and desserts.

Would I drink nothing but fruit juice? No...However, to say that gatorade is better for you than fruit juice because it has less sugar is absurd, and any doctor or nutritionist that tells you this probably got their degree by mailing in four cereal box tops with $2.99 shipping and handling...
The question pertained to sugar, which is why I focused on that aspect only. I don't recommend anyone drink large amounts of either gatorade or orange juice. As you state, gatorade has too much salt (and OJ has too much sugar). Gatorade's specific purpose is for replenishment after hard exercise. I still don't drink even for that.

Yes, the sugar that occurs naturally in OJ is not exactly the same as the sugar in desserts and sodas, but it has just as many calories and is no better for you. This is a very long topic by itself.

I though I made it clear the opinion of drinking gatorade over OJ was my own. I meant to consult a doctor for comparing fruit vs. fruit juices and vegetables vs. vegetable juices.

You don't need to tell me about water. Ozarka Spring Water is exactly why I don't drink gatorade or fruit juices.

fba34
11-08-2005, 04:43 PM
why are calories bad for you? its only bad if you take in more calories than you're using, which would lead to gaining fat weight.

also why is non-concentrated better than concentrated? i always thought that concentrated just means that water was removed. does it mean something else in the food industry?

btw, i drink a glass of concentrated orang/apple juice a day for the vitamin c. its cheap, and easier than buying oranges, always some bad ones in the bunch.

swilkins
11-08-2005, 04:49 PM
How many grams of sugar is reported in the nutrition facts?

That might only be a good test, if you compared 2 side by side. Unfortunately, I'm thinking that sugars might also include the natural frustose that is part of the natural fruit.

krosfyah
11-08-2005, 04:56 PM
Apparently Gatorade is the worst thing you can drink...for your teeth.

My dentist told me that Gatorade is worse than coke or coffee for turning your teeth yellow. It is the acid level in the syrup that sticks to your teeth and causes discoloration.

mbiker
11-08-2005, 06:55 PM
To be safe look at the ingredients. If the only ingredient is an orange, then they are not adding sugar, corn syrup, or my favorite evaporated cane juice.

In my opinion, Gatorade is chemical drink and I like to keep man made food out of my body.

codell
11-08-2005, 07:01 PM
Anyone tried Simply Orange O.J.?

Best OJ I've ever had.

apostolic3
11-08-2005, 07:10 PM
why are calories bad for you? its only bad if you take in more calories than you're using, which would lead to gaining fat weight.

also why is non-concentrated better than concentrated? i always thought that concentrated just means that water was removed. does it mean something else in the food industry?

btw, i drink a glass of concentrated orang/apple juice a day for the vitamin c. its cheap, and easier than buying oranges, always some bad ones in the bunch.
Calories aren't bad for you, but consuming too many calories is a national problem. 70% of people in this country are overweight, and half of those 70% are obese. Calories (specifically sugar) in liquids is a huge part of the problem. Some people consume 1/4 to 1/3 their calories through sugarfied liquids (sodas, Starbucks other various juices, etc). Calories consumed via liquids also don't satiate appetites as much as solid foods and this exacerbates the overconsumption. And don't forget alcoholic beverages.